The Diet Self Efficacy Scale (DIET-SE)

Background:

The Diet Self Efficacy Scale DIET-SE consists of three factors. The first factor is called high caloric food temptations (HCF). It consists of four items describing situations in which the exposure to tempting high caloric food (e.g., cake or ice cream) might make it difficult to resist eating it. The second is called social and internal factors (SIF). It consists of four items describing situations in which social or internal factors, such as being with friends or feeling tired, might make it difficult to resist eating. The third factor is called negative emotional events (NEE). It consists of three items that describe situations in which negative emotional events might make it difficult to resist eating, for example, having had an upsetting argument with a romantic partner.

Psychometrics:

Internal consistency: The internal consistency for the DIET-SE ranges from α = .82 to .87 in the studies reported in Stich et al. (2009). The internal consistency values for the three subscales range from α = .70 to .77 for HCF, α = .71 to .79 for SIF, and α = .75 to .79 for NEE.  Test-retest reliability: Test-retest correlations for a 2- to 3-week interval are rtt = .83 for the DIET-SE scale, rtt = .75 for the HCF, rtt = .77 for the SIF, and rtt = .80 for the NEE subscale. The DIET-SE represents a short, reliable, and valid scenario-based measure of dieting self-efficacy.

Author of Tool:

Knäuper, B.

Key references:

Stich, C., Knäuper, B., & Tint, A. (2009). A scenario-based measure of dieting self-efficacy: The DIET-SE. Assessment, 16, 16-30.

Primary use / Purpose:

This scale assesses scenario-based eating temptations for a range of dieting situations.

Stich, C., Knäuper, B., & Tint, A. (2009). A scenario-based measure of dieting self-efficacy: The DIET-SE. Assessment, 16, 16-30.

The Diet Self Efficacy Scale (DIET-SE)

The DIET-SE consists of three factors. The first factor is called high caloric food temptations (HCF). It consists of four items describing situations in which the exposure to tempting high caloric food (e.g., cake or ice cream) might make it difficult to resist eating it. The second is called social and internal factors (SIF). It consists of four items describing situations in which social or internal factors, such as being with friends or feeling tired, might make it difficult to resist eating. The third factor is called negative emotional events (NEE). It consists of three items that describe situations in which negative emotional events might make it difficult to resist eating, for example, having had an upsetting argument with a romantic partner.

Internal consistency: The internal consistency for the DIET-SE ranges from α = .82 to .87 in the studies reported in Stich et al. (2009). The internal consistency values for the three subscales range from α = .70 to .77 for HCF, α = .71 to .79 for SIF, and α = .75 to .79 for NEE.

Test-retest reliability: Test-retest correlations for a 2- to 3-week interval are rtt = .83 for the DIET- SE scale, rtt = .75 for the HCF, rtt = .77 for the SIF, and rtt = .80 for the NEE subscale.

The DIET-SE

The following questions relate to situations and behaviors that can hinder weight loss or weight control.

Please imagine yourself in each of the following situations and rate how confident you are that you could overcome them, using the 5-point scale below. Completely fill in the circle that best indicates how confident you feel that you could overcome the situation.

  • 1. You are having dinner with your family and your favorite meal has been prepared. You finish the first helping and someone says, "Why don't you have some more?" How confident are you that you would turn down a second helping
  • 2. You often overeat at supper because you are tired and hungry when you get home. How confident are you that you would not overeat at supper?
  • 3. There is a party at work for a coworker and someone offers you a piece of cake. How confident are you that you would turn it down?
  • 4. You just had an upsetting argument with a family member. You are standing in front of the refrigerator and you feel like eating everything in sight. How confident are you that you would find some other way to make yourself feel better?
  • 5. You are invited to someone's house for dinner and your host is an excellent cook. You often overeat because the food tastes so good. How confident are you that you would not overeat as a dinner guest?
  • 6. You finished your meal and you still feel hungry. There are cakes and fruits available. How confident are you that you would choose the fruits?
  • 7. You are at a friend's house and your friend offers you a delicious looking pastry. How confident are you that you would refuse this offer?
  • 8. You are having a hard day at work and you are anxious and upset. You feel like getting a candy bar. How confident are you that you would find a more constructive way to calm down and cope with your feelings?
  • 9. You feel like celebrating. You are going out with friends to a good restaurant. How confident are you that you would celebrate without overeating?
  • 10. You are out with a friend at lunch time and your friend suggests that you stop and get some ice cream. How confident are you that you would resist the temptation?
  • 11. You just had an argument with your boy- friend or girlfriend. You are upset, angry, and you feel like eating something. How confident are you that you would talk the situation over with someone or go for a walk instead of eating?