Parental Support for Fighting scale

When it comes to fighting the scale, parental support is essential. Parents can provide the guidance, insight, and encouragement that young people need to make healthy lifestyle choices and develop healthy habits. In todays society, body image and weight have become an increasingly important issue for many young people. Many teens struggle with body image issues and feelings of low self-esteem due to the pressure to look a certain way. This pressure can lead to unhealthy behaviors such as crash dieting, binge eating, and excessive exercise. Parents can play an important role in helping their children fight the scale. Parents should talk openly and honestly with their children about body image and weight. They should encourage healthy eating habits and physical activity. They should also provide positive reinforcement and support when their children make healthy choices. Parents should also be aware of their own body image and weight issues. Children often take cues from their parents, and if parents are overly concerned about their own body image, their children may become overly concerned as well. Parents should also be aware of the medias influence on body image. Television, movies, magazines, and other media outlets often portray unrealistic body images that can lead to unhealthy comparisons and body image issues. Parents should talk to their children about media messages and help them understand that media images are often not realistic. Finally, parents should be aware of any signs that their children may be struggling with body image issues. Signs may include drastic changes in eating habits, excessive exercising, or avoiding activities due to body image concerns. If parents notice any of these signs, they should seek help from a mental health professional. Parental support is essential in helping young people fight the scale. Parents should talk openly and honestly with their children about body image and weight, encourage healthy habits, and be aware of their own body image issues. They should also be aware of the medias influence on body image and any signs that their children may be struggling with body image issues. With parental support and guidance, young people can make healthy lifestyle choices and develop healthy habits.
Does your parent tell you these things about fighting?
Aggressive Solutions
1. If someone hits you‚ hit them back.
2. If someone calls you names‚ hit them.
3. If someone calls you names‚ call them names back.
4. If someone asks you to fight‚ hit them first.
5. If you can’t solve the problem by talking‚ it is best to solve it through fighting.
Non-Aggressive Solutions
6. If someone calls you names‚ ignore them.
7. If someone asks you to fight‚ you should try to talk your way out of a fight.
8. You should think the problem through‚ calm yourself‚ and then talk the problem out with your friend.
9. If another student asks you to fight‚ you should tell a teacher or someone older.
10. No matter what‚ fighting is not good; there are other ways to solve problems.
 
  • Hitting
  • Resolving conflicts
 
 
This instrument can be found on pages 306-307 of Measuring Violence-Related Attitudes‚ Behaviors‚ and Influences Among Youths: A Compendium of Assessment Tools‚ available online at: http://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/pdf/YV_Compendium.pdf
 
Point values are assigned as follows:
Yes=0‚ No= 1
Point values are assigned as indicated above. Point values are summed and then divided by the number of items in each subscale. Intended range is between 0 and 1.
Aggressive Solutions: High values indicate the perception of strong parental support for aggression or fighting in response to conflict.
Non-Aggressive Solutions: High scores indicate the perception of strong parental support for peaceful solutions to conflict.
 

Multisite Violence Prevention Project. Description of measures: cohort-wide student survey‚ 2004.Available from the Centers for Disease Control andPrevention‚ National Center for Injury Preventionand Control‚ Atlanta‚ GA

Orpinas P‚ Murray N‚ Kelder S. Parental influences on students’ aggressive behavior and weapon carrying.Health Education and Behavior1999;26(6):774-787.