Fighting—High Risk Behavioral Assessment

When it comes to assessing high-risk behaviors, fighting is one of the most dangerous and potentially life-threatening activities that can occur. It is important for mental health professionals to be aware of the signs and symptoms of potential fighting, as well as the risk factors associated with it. When assessing the risk of fighting, it is important to consider the individuals history of violence, as well as any current or past mental health issues. It is also important to consider any environmental factors that may be contributing to the individuals behavior. For example, if the individual is in an environment where violence is accepted or encouraged, this can increase the likelihood of fighting. In addition, if the individual is exposed to drugs or alcohol, this can also increase the risk of fighting. In addition to considering the individuals history and environment, it is also important to assess the individuals current state of mind. If the individual is feeling angry, frustrated, or overwhelmed, this can increase the risk of fighting. It is also important to assess the individuals coping skills, as well as their ability to control their emotions and behavior. When assessing the risk of fighting, it is also important to consider the individuals social support system. If the individual does not have a strong support system, this can increase the risk of fighting. It is also important to consider the individuals access to resources, such as counseling or anger management. If the individual does not have access to these resources, this can also increase the risk of fighting. Finally, it is important to assess the individuals attitude towards fighting. If the individual views fighting as an acceptable way to resolve conflicts, this can increase the risk of fighting. It is also important to assess the individuals ability to recognize the consequences of their actions. If the individual does not understand the potential consequences of fighting, this can also increase the risk of fighting. By assessing the individuals history, environment, current state of mind, social support system, access to resources, and attitude towards fighting, mental health professionals can better assess the risk of fighting. By understanding the risk factors associated with fighting, mental health professionals can provide the individual with the necessary interventions and resources to reduce the risk of fighting.


1
A. Why do you think people fight?
 . . . . . . . . . . . . .
 . . . . . . . . . . . .
B. Have you seen others get into a “yelling” fight where they only used their words and didn’t hit?
■ Yes ■ No
C. How often? Rarely (1-3/year) ‚ Occasionally (1-2/month)‚ Regularly (daily or 1-2/week)
2
A. Have your friends gotten into “yelling” fights?
■ Yes ■ No
B. How often? Rarely(1-3/year)‚ Occasionally(1-2/month)‚ Regularly (daily or 1-2/week)
3
3. A. Have you gotten into “yelling” fights?
■ Yes ■ No
B. How often? Rarely(1-3/year)‚ Occasionally(1-2/month)‚ Regularly (daily or 1-2/week)
C. Why do you get into these yelling fights?
. . . . . . . . . . . . .
 . . . . . . . . . . . .
4
A. Have you seen others get into fights where they had to punch or kick to defend themselves?
■ Yes ■ No
B. How often? Rarely(1-3/year)‚ Occasionally(1-2/month)‚ Regularly (daily or 1-2/week)
5
5. A. Have you seen your friends get into fights where they had to punch or kick to defend themselves?
■ Yes ■ No
B. How often? Rarely(1-3/year)‚ Occasionally(1-2/month)‚ Regularly (daily or 1-2/week)
6
A. Have you gotten into fights where you had to punch or kick to defend yourself?
■ Yes ■ No
B. How often? Rarely(1-3/year)‚ Occasionally(1-2/month)‚ Regularly (daily or 1-2/week)
7
A. Have you seen others get into fights where they had to use a knife or gun to defend themselves?
■ Yes ■ No
B. How often? Rarely(1-3/year)‚ Occasionally(1-2/month)‚ Regularly (daily or 1-2/week)
8
A. Have you seen your friends get into fights where they had to use a knife or gun to defend themselves?
■ Yes ■ No
B. How often? Rarely(1-3/year)‚ Occasionally(1-2/month)‚ Regularly (daily or 1-2/week)
9
A. Have you gotten into fights where you had to use a knife or gun to defend yourself?
■ Yes ■ No
B. How often? Rarely(1-3/year)‚ Occasionally(1-2/month)‚ Regularly (daily or 1-2/week)
10
A. Have you ever been in a situation where you were scared and couldn’t defend yourself?
■ Yes ■ No
B. How often? Rarely(1-3/year)‚ Occasionally(1-2/month)‚ Regularly (daily or 1-2/week)
 
This assessment measures the frequency of peer fighting‚ punching‚ kicking‚ knife‚ and gun use. Questions are asked during a one-on-one interview..
This instrument can be found on pages 193-194 of Measuring Violence-Related Attitudes‚ Behaviors‚ and Influences Among Youths: A Compendium of Assessment Tools‚ available online at:http://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/pdf/YV_Compendium.pdf .
Students aged 8-18.
 
The number of “A” items to which the respondent answered “yes” are summed. Then for those respondents who scored at least 1‚ the frequency is calculated by averaging the answers for the “B” items (How often?).
Point values are assigned as follows:
Rarely = 1
Occasionally = 2
Regularly = 3
A high score indicates a high level of exposure to aggressive family behavior.
 

Dolan S. Doctoral Dissertation. Chicago‚ IL: University of Chicago‚ Department of Psychology‚1989.