Antibias and Multicultural Curriculum Assessment Profile (AMCAP)

Antibias and Multicultural Curriculum Assessment Profile (AMCAP)
Samuels‚ 1993‚ 1994
 
1.    Helps each child build pride in his/her self‚ family and culture.
2.    Encourages each child's understanding of themself as an individual and in relation to others.
3.    Provides a physical environment that authentically reflects and supports each child's cultural‚ racial and/or ethnicidentity‚ physical ableness‚ and family lifestyle (e.g.‚materials such as puzzles‚ paintings‚ music‚ pictures‚books‚ dolls‚ etc.).
4.    Recognizes each child's individual strengths and unique ch‎aracteristics regardless of race‚ ethnicity‚ culture‚ sex‚mental or physical ableness.
5.    Avoids making comparisons among and between children.
6.    Helps each child to accept‚ respect‚ and appreciate his/her own and others' unique strengths.
7.    Helps each child understand‚ accept‚ appreciate‚ and respect individual and others' similarities and differences (e.g.‚ physical ch‎aracteristics‚ including skin‚ eye‚ and hair color‚ physical ability‚ gender‚ culture‚ ethnicity‚ family lifestyles‚ etc.).
8.    Accepts and respects each child as an individual; that is‚ recognizing what each child values and holds dear.
9.    Incorporates each child's cultural and/or ethnic background into curriculum planning (e.g.‚ uses songs and games from various cultures‚ dramatizes stories from various cultural origins represented in the classroom‚ etc.).
10.Gathers and appropriately incorporates information from families into the curriculum about what they want their children to know about the various aspects of their cultural and/or ethnic individual and group identity.
11.Encourages free discussion and communication among and between children and adults about diversity (e.g.‚ uses open-ended questions such as "What do you think ...?‚ etc.).
12.Encourages children to respect others' rights (e.g.‚ uses words such as "Anyone can play in the block center"‚ etc.).
13.Provides experiences that encourage positive cooperative interactions among racial/ethnic‚ gender‚ and abilitygroups‚ including special needs children.
14.Provides activities and materials that encourage appropriate and positive interaction between gender groups
15.Provides experiences that encourages the development of positive and supportive relationships among racial‚ ethnic‚gender‚ and ability groups‚ including special needs children.
16.Utilizes a variety (at least 3 different types each) of diverse and bias-free activities and materials (e.g.‚ varied ethnic‚ racial‚ gender‚ and special needs representation in pictures‚ books‚ toys such as dolls‚ puzzles‚ games‚ etc.).Models and encourages nondiscriminatory behavior.
17.Encourages development and expression of empathy (understanding others' feelings) among and between children and adults (e.g.‚ uses words such as "John‚ you hurt Emilo feelings when you said he has an ugly name"‚ etc.).
18.Encourages development and expression of altruism (helping others) among and between children and adults.
19.Helps children feel accepted in the classroom culture (e.g.‚ serves meals that reflect foods acceptable in represented cultures‚ etc.).
20.Helps children to express themselves in a manner socially acceptable within the classroom culture. (Please note: social expression is culturally determined.)
21.Gathers and appropriately uses information from families about their cultural and/or ethnic socialization values and methods.
22.Discusses and explores various languages people use to communicate (e.g.‚ English‚ Spanish‚ American Sign Language‚ etc.).
23.Engages children in critical thinking and questioning about stereotypes (unfair and untrue images).
24.Engages children in critical thinking about unfair or hurtful behaviors (e.g.‚ teasing‚ name calling‚ discrimination‚ bias‚ etc.).
25.Provides age-appropriate activities and experiences that encourage children's exploration and curiosity of their owndirect experiences of Inviting community members to share aspects of their culture‚ etc
26.Builds upon what children already know about human similarities and differences (e.g.‚ sex‚ hair‚ eye‚ and skincolor‚ etc.) and preferences (likes and dislikes).
27.Introduces developmentally appropriate multicultural and antibias concepts children can understand (e.g.‚ everyone is capable‚ everyone deserves respect‚ people are similar and different‚ culture comes from parents and families‚ etc.).
28.Responds appropriately and immediately (that is‚ answers or explores) to children's curiosity and/or questioning about cultural‚ ethnic‚ sex‚ and/or ability similarities and differences‚ bias‚ discrimination‚ etc.
29.Responds to children In ways that extend their thinking about multicultural and antibias concepts.
30.Implements activities and techniques to help each child form an awareness and understanding of bias.
31.Engages children in developmentally appropriate discussions about topics relative to bias‚ prejudice‚culture‚ ethnicity‚ gender‚ and ability similarities and differences.
32.Communicates in a clear‚ direct‚ and understandable way with children about bias relative to cultural and/or ethnic similarities and differences.
33.Clarifies children's misconceptions about bias (e.g.‚ misconceptions such as believing if one sits in a wheelchair they will never walk again‚ being afraid of African Americans because they have funny hair‚ or distrusting Asians because they have different names‚ etc.).
34.Encourages children's curiosity and enthusiasm to learn about different cultural‚ ethnic‚ ability‚ gender‚ and special needs groups.
35.Capitalizes on opportunities to counteract biased thinking (e.g.‚ using words such as "some Indians use to live in teepees‚ but now Indians live in homes like you and I."‚ etc.).
36.Helps children develop ways to speak out against biased behavior toward self and others.
37.Seeks information from families about how they want their children to handle bias directed against them or others.
38.Facilitates children's verbal expression through reflections of their thoughts (e.g.‚ "It sounds like you ..."‚ etc.).
39.Facilitates children's understanding through reflections of their and others' feelings (e.g.‚” You’re feeling really sad because Jamie called you 'brown skin'..."‚ etc.).
40.Models verbal language that helps children identify and describe their feelings (e.g.‚ “You’re mad because ...‚ etc.).
41.Encourages problem-solving techniques in incidents such as teasing or being rejected from a group (e.g.‚ "Jose wants to play with you In the block center. If you two play together‚ what can you build?"‚ etc.).
42.Models and encourages nonbiased behaviors (e.g.‚ suggests both sexes try cooking or a woodworking project‚ etc.).
43.Models and encourages nonbiased language (e.g.‚ police officer‚ firefighter‚ as well as ethnic or cultural terms such as Native American‚ etc.).
44.Models and encourages nondiscriminatory behavior (e.g.‚ interacts with all children‚ etc.).
45.Models and encourages nondiscriminatory language (e.g.‚ refrains from referring to cultural or ethnic groups as "those people"‚ etc.).
46.Redirects children's inappropriate and/or unacceptable biased behavior toward themselves and others.
Revised
1.    Helps each child build pride in his/her self‚ family and culture.
2.    Models and encourages nondiscriminatory behavior.
3.    Incorporates each child's cultural and/or ethnic background into curriculum planning (e.g.‚ uses songs and games from various cultures‚ dramatizes stories from various cultural origins‚ etc.).
4.    Models and encourages nondiscriminatory behavior.
5.    Clarifies children's misconceptions about bias (e.g.‚ misconceptions such as believing If one sits in a wheelchair they will never walk again‚ being afraid of African Americans because they have funny hair‚ or distrusting Asians because they have different names‚ etc.).
6.    Recognizes‚ respects‚ and accepts each child's individual strengths and unique ch‎aracteristics regardless of race‚ ethnicity‚ culture‚ gender‚ cognitive or physical ability.
7.    Gathers and appropriately uses information from families about their cultural and/or ethnic background.
8.    Redirects children's inappropriate and/or unacceptable biased behavior toward themselves and others.
9.    Models verbal language that helps children identify and describe their feelings (e.g.‚ 'You're mad because etc.).
10.Avoids making comparisons among and between children.
11.Encourages development and expression of empathy among and between children and adults.
12.Provides experiences that encourage positive cooperative interactions among racial/ethnic‚ gender‚ and abilitygroups.
13.Engages children in critical thinking and questioning about stereotypes (unfair and untrue images).
14.Provides age-appropriate activities and experiences that encourage children's exploration and curiosity of their owndirect experiences of bias based on cultural/ethnic‚ gender‚ability‚ similarities and differences‚ etc.
15.Builds upon what children already know about human similarities and differences (e.g.‚ sex‚ hair‚ eye‚ and skincolor‚ etc.) and preferences (likes and dislikes).
16.Provides experiences that encourages the development of positive and supportive relationships among racial‚ ethnic‚gender‚ and ability groups.
17.Engages children in developmentally appropriate discussions about topics relative to bias‚ prejudice‚culture‚ ethnicity‚ gender‚ and ability similarities and differences.
18.Facilitates children's verbal expression through reflections of their thoughts (e.g.‚ "It sounds like you think...''‚''Do you think that …” etc.).
19.implements activities and techniques to help each child form an awareness and understanding of bias.
20.Responds appropriately and immediately (that is‚ answers or explores) to children's curiosity and/or questioning about cultural‚ ethnic‚ gender and/or ability similarities and differences‚ bias‚ discrimination‚ etc.
21.Facilitates children's understanding through reflections of their and others' feelings (e.g.‚ Liz‚ Jamie is feeling really sad because you called him 'brown skin'..."‚ "John is angry because Mary and Nia will not let him play with the dolls."‚ etc.).
22.Helps each child to accept‚ respect‚ understand‚ and appreciate his/her own and others' unique strengths.
23.Encourages development and expression of altruism among and between children and adults.
24.Utilizes at least 3 different types of diverse and bias-free activities and materials (e.g.‚ varied ethnic/racial‚ gender‚ and special needs reflected in pictures‚ books‚ toys such as dolls‚ puzzles‚ games‚ etc.) that represents at least 3 different types of cultural and/or ethnic groups.
25.Seeks information from families about how they want their children to handle bias directed against them or others.
26.Encourages each child's understanding of themself as an individual and in relation to others.
27.Helps each child understand‚ accept‚ appreciate‚ and respect individual and others' similarities and differences (e.g.‚ physical ch‎aracteristics‚ including skin‚ eye‚ and hair color‚ physical ability‚ gender‚ culture‚ ethnicity‚ family lifestyles‚ etc.).
 
OBSERVATION :1= PRESENT‚ 0 =ABSENT
IMPORTANCE: 1= Low‚ 2= Some‚ 3= Moderate‚ 4= High
SKILL LEVEL: 1= Low‚ 2= Some‚ 3= Moderate‚ 4= High
 
 

Samuels‚ Valerie Jarvis‚ (1994). "Teacher beliefs and classroom practices regarding a curriculum that is multicultural and antibias ". Retrospective Theses and Dissertations. 11317. http://lib.dr.iastate.edu/rtd/11317