Multicultural Counseling Self-Efficacy Scale – Racial Diversity Form (MCSE-RD).

Multicultural Counseling Self-Efficacy Scale – Racial Diversity Form (MCSE-RD).
Hung-Bin Sheu‚ 2005
 
1. Multicultural Intervention
1.    Remain flexible and accepting in resolving cross-cultural strains or impasses.
2.    Manage your own racially or culturally based countertransference toward the client (e.g.‚ over identification with the client because of his or her race).
3.    Help the client to clarify how cultural factors (e.g.‚ racism‚ acculturation‚ racial identity) may relate to her or his maladaptive beliefs and conflicted feelings.
4.    Admit and accept responsibility when you‚ as the counselor‚ have initiated the cross-cultural impasse.
5.    Encourage the client to express his or her negative feelings resulting from cross-cultural misunderstanding or impasses.
6.    Assess the salience and meaningfulness of culture/race in the client’s life.
7.    Resolve misunderstanding with the client that stems from differences in culturally based style of communication (e.g.‚ acquiescence versus confrontation).
8.    Help the client to identify how cultural factors (e.g.‚ racism‚ acculturation‚ racial identity) may relate to his or her maladaptive relational patterns.
9.    Take into account multicultural constructs (e.g.‚ acculturation‚ racial identity) when conceptualizing the client’s presenting problems.
10.Manage your own anxiety due to cross-cultural impasses that arise in the session.
11.Respond in a therapeutic way when the client challenges your multicultural counseling competency.
12.Assess relevant cultural factors (e.g.‚ the client’s acculturation level‚ racial identity‚ cultural values and beliefs).
13.Help the client to set counseling goals that take into account expectations from her or his family.
14.Openly discuss cultural differences and similarities between the client and yourself.
15.Address issues of cultural mistrust in ways that can improve the therapeutic relationship.
16.Help the client to develop culturally appropriate ways to deal with systems (e.g.‚ school‚ community) that affect him or her.
17.Help the client to develop new and more adaptive behaviors that are consistent with his or her cultural background.
18.Repair cross-cultural impasses that arise due to problems in the use or timing of particular skills (e.g.‚ introduce the topic of race into therapy when the client is not ready to discuss).
19.Help the client to utilize family/community resources to reach her or his goals.
20.Deal with power-related disparities (i.e.‚ counselor power versus client powerlessness) with a client who has experienced racism or discrimination.
21.Take into account cultural explanations of the client’s presenting issues in case conceptualization.
22.Where appropriate‚ help the client to explore racism or discrimination in relation to his or her presenting issues.
23.Take into account the impact that family may have on the client in case conceptualization.
24.Deliver treatment to a client who prefers a different counseling style (i.e.‚ directive versus non-directive).
2. Multicultural Assessment
25.Treat culture-bound syndromes (DSM-IV) for racially diverse clients (e.g.‚ brain fag‚ neurasthenia‚ nervios‚ ghost sickness).
26.Assess culture-bound syndromes (DSM-IV) for racially diverse clients (e.g.‚ brain fag‚ neurasthenia‚ nervios‚ ghost sickness).
27.Interpret standardized tests (e.g.‚ MMPI-2‚ Strong Interest Inventory) in ways sensitive to cultural differences.
28.se‎lect culturally appropriate assessment tools according to the client’s cultural background.
29.Use non-standardized methods or procedures (e.g.‚ card sort‚ guided fantasy) to assess the client’s concerns in a culturally sensitive way.
30.Conduct a mental status examination in a culturally sensitive way.
3. Multicultural Counseling Session Management
31.Encourage the client to take an active role in counseling.
32.Evaluate counseling progress in an on-going fashion.
33.Respond effectively to the client’s feelings related to termination (e.g.‚ sadness‚ feeling of loss‚ pride‚ relief).
34.Keep sessions on track and focused with a client who is not familiar with the counseling process.
35.Assess the client’s readiness for termination.
36.Help the client to articulate what she or he has learned from counseling during the termination process.
37.Identify and integrate the client’s culturally specific way of saying goodbye in the termination process.
 
60 items before exploratory factor analysis
When working with a client who is racially different from yourself‚ how confident are you that you could do the following tasks effectively over the next week?
1. Explain the counseling process to a client who is not familiar with Western mental health services.
2. Develop a strong working alliance with the client.
3. When appropriate‚ adopt different helping roles other than counselor/therapist (e.g.‚ mentor‚ consultant‚ advocate‚ coach).
4. Make culturally appropriate referrals (e.g.‚ to indigenous healers in the community) when necessary.
5. Openly discuss cultural differences and similarities between the client and yourself.
6. Address issues of cultural mistrust in ways that can improve the therapeutic relationship.
7. Make use of the client’s verbal and nonverbal communication to decide whether the session is going in the right direction.
8. Help the client to articulate what she or he has learned from counseling during the termination process.
9. Where appropriate‚ help the client to explore racism or discrimination in relation to his or her presenting issues.
10. Evaluate rapport to see where you and the client stand in the therapeutic relationship.
11. Keep sessions on track and focused with a client who is not familiar with the counseling process.
12. Help the client to anticipate both culturally and non-culturally specific barriers that may hinder him or her from achieving future goals.
13. Convey an understanding of the client’s presenting issues in a way that is consistent with her or his cultural background.
14. Facilitate the client’s willingness to work with you as a team toward mutually-agreed goals.
15. Pay attention to cultural differences between yourself and the client that may be affecting counseling.
16. Respond effectively to the client’s feelings related to termination (e.g.‚ sadness‚ feeling of loss‚ pride‚ relief).
17. Encourage the client to take an active role in counseling.
18. Collaborate with the client in developing a therapeutic relationship compatible with his or her cultural background.
19. Evaluate counseling progress in an on-going fashion.
20. Identify and integrate the client’s culturally specific way of saying good-bye in the termination process.
21. Help a client to deal with his or her fear of stigma about seeking counseling.
22. Negotiate with the client regarding the tasks of counseling.
23. Assess the client’s readiness for termination.  
24. When relevant‚ introduce culture/race into counseling in a way the clients can easily understand and accept.
25. se‎lect culturally appropriate assessment tools according to the client’s cultural background.
26. Interpret standardized tests (e.g.‚ MMPI-2‚ Strong Interest Inventory) in ways sensitive to cultural differences.
27. Take into account cultural factors (e.g.‚ the client’s racial identity development‚ acculturation level‚ cultural values) when delivering treatment.
28. Deal with power-related disparities (i.e.‚ counselor power versus client powerlessness) with a client who has experienced racism or discrimination.
29. Respond effectively to the client’s resistant behaviors (e.g.‚ anger‚ withdrawal) resulting from cross-cultural misunderstandings or impasses.
30. Use non-standardized methods or procedures (e.g.‚ card sort‚ guided fantasy) to assess the client’s concerns in a culturally sensitive way.
31. Take into account the impact that family may have on the client in case conceptualization.
32. Develop homework that is appropriate given the client’s cultural background.
33. Manage language barriers with a client whose first language is not English.
34. Address cross-cultural conflicts in a therapeutic way.
35. Assess relevant cultural factors (e.g.‚ the client’s acculturation level‚ racial identity‚ cultural values and beliefs).
36. Take into account cultural explanations of the client’s presenting issues in case conceptualization.
37. Adjust existing counseling techniques (e.g.‚ empty chair) to make them appropriate to the client’s cultural background.
38. Respond to the client’s transference in a culturally sensitive way.
39. Repair cross-cultural impasses that arise due to problems in the use or timing of particular skills (e.g.‚ introduce the topic of race into therapy when the client is not ready to discuss).
40. Conduct a mental status examination in a culturally sensitive way.
41. Help the client to set counseling goals that are consistent with his or her cultural values.
42. Help the client to develop culturally appropriate ways to deal with systems (e.g.‚ school‚ community) that affect him or her.
43. Manage your own anxiety due to cross-cultural impasses that arise in the session.
44. Respond with the most appropriate counseling skill when therapy stalls as a result of culture.
45. Assess culture-bound syndromes (DSM-IV) for racially diverse clients (e.g.‚ brain fag‚ neurasthenia‚ nervios‚ ghost sickness).
46. Help the client to set counseling goals that take into account expectations from her or his family.
47. Help the client to identify how cultural factors (e.g.‚ racism‚ acculturation‚ racial identity) may relate to his or her maladaptive relational patterns.
48. Manage your own racially or culturally based countertransference toward the client (e.g.‚ over identification with the client because of his or her race).
49. Encourage the client to express his or her negative feelings resulting from cross-cultural misunderstanding or impasses.
50. Assess the salience and meaningfulness of culture/race in the client’s life.
51. Take into account multicultural constructs (e.g.‚ acculturation‚ racial identity) when conceptualizing the client’s presenting problems.
52. Help the client to clarify how cultural factors (e.g.‚ racism‚ acculturation‚ racial identity) may relate to her or his maladaptive beliefs and conflicted feelings.
53. Respond in a therapeutic way when the client challenges your multicultural counseling competency.
54. Admit and accept responsibility when you‚ as the counselor‚ have initiated the cross-cultural impasse.
55. Help the client to develop new and more adaptive behaviors that are consistent with his or her cultural background.
56. Resolve misunderstanding with the client that stems from differences in culturally based style of communication (e.g.‚ acquiescence versus
57. Remain flexible and accepting in resolving cross cultural strains or impasses.
58. Treat culture-bound syndromes (DSM-IV) for racially diverse clients (e.g.‚ brain fag‚ neurasthenia‚ nervios‚ ghost sickness).
59. Help the client to utilize family/community resources to reach her or his goals.
60. Deliver treatment to a client who prefers a different counseling style (i.e.‚ directive versus nondirective).
Multicultural Intervention (0.98)‚ Multicultural Assessment (0.92)‚ Multicultural Counseling Session Management (0.94)
 
 
0= No Confidence at all ‚ 2‚ 3‚ 4‚ 5= Some Confidence‚ 6‚ 7‚ 8‚ 9=Complete Confidence
 

Sheu. Hung-Bin.‚ Lent. R.W.‚ Robert. W.‚ (2007). Development and initial validation of the Multicultural Counseling Self-Efficacy Scale-‎-Racial Diversity Form. Psychotherapy‚ Theory‚ Research & Practice ;44(1):30-45

Sheu. Hung-Bin.‚ (2005). Development and initial validation of the Multicultural Counseling Self-Efficacy Scale-‎-Racial Diversity Form. Thesis of (M.A.). University of Maryland.

Sheu‚ Hung-Bin; Rigali-Oiler‚ Marybeth; Lent‚ Robert W. 2012. Multicultural Counseling Self-Efficacy Scale – Racial Diversity Form: Factor structure and test of a social cognitive model. Psychotherapy Research; 22(5)‚ 527-542(16).