Therapy Attitude Inventory (TAI)

Therapy Attitude Inventory (TAI)
Brestan‚ Jacobs‚ Rayfield‚ & Eyberg‚ 1999
     I.        Regarding techniques of disciplining‚ I feel I have learned
1. Nothing‚ 2. Very Little‚ 3. A Few New Techniques‚ 4. Several New Techniques‚ 5. Very Many Useful Techniques
   II.        Regarding techniques for teaching my child new skills‚ I feel I have learned
1. Nothing‚ 2. Very Little‚ 3. A Few New Techniques‚ 4. Several New Techniques‚ 5. Very Many Useful Techniques
 III.        Regarding the relationship between myself and my child‚ I feel we get along
1. Much Worse Than Before‚ 2. Somewhat More Than Before‚ 3. The Same As Before‚ 4. Somewhat Better Than Before‚ 5. Very Much Better Than Before
 IV.        Regarding my confidence in my ability to discipline my child‚ I feel
1. Much Less Confident‚ 2. Somewhat Less Confident‚ 3. The Same‚ 4. Somewhat More Confident‚ 5. Much More Confident
    V.        The major behavior problems that my child presented at home before the program started are at this time
1. Considerably Worse‚ 2. Somewhat Worse‚ 3. The Same‚ 4. Somewhat Improved‚ 5. Greatly Improved
 VI.        I feel that my child’s compliance to my commands or requests is at this time
1. Considerably Worse‚ 2. Somewhat Worse‚ 3. The Same‚ 4. Somewhat Improved‚ 5. Greatly
Improved
VII.        Regarding the progress my child has made in his/her general behavior‚ I am
1. Very Dissatisfied‚ 2. Somewhat Dissatisfied‚ 3. Neutral 4. Somewhat Satisfied‚ 5. Very
Satisfied
VIII.        To what degree has the treatment program helped with other general personal or family problems not directly related to your child in the program
1. Hindered Much More Than Helped‚ 2. Hindered Slightly‚ 3. Neither Helped Nor Hindered‚ 4. Helped Somewhat‚ 5. Helped Very Much
 IX.        I feel the type of program that was used to help me improve the behaviors of my child was
1. Very Poor 2‚ Poor‚ 3. Adequate‚ 4. Good‚ 5. Very Good
    X.        My general feeling about the program I participate in‚ is
1. I Disliked It Very Much‚ 2. I Disliked It Somewhat‚ 3. I Feel Neutral‚ 4. I Liked It Somewhat‚ 5. I Liked It Very Much
Supplemental Therapeutic Attitude Inventory
[XI. My overall level of comfort regarding the in-room coaching was
1. I Was Very Uncomfortable‚ 2. I Was Somewhat Uncomfortable‚ 3. I Feel Neutral 4. I Was Somewhat Comfortable‚ 5. I Was Very Comfortable]
 XI.        level of comfort with the ethnicity of your therapist/coach
1. not comfortable‚ 2. Somewhat uncomfortable‚ 3. Neutral‚ 4. Somewhat comfortable‚ 5. Very comfortable
XII.        level of comfort with the ethnicity of the assessment staff
1. not comfortable‚ 2. Somewhat uncomfortable‚ 3. Neutral‚ 4. Somewhat comfortable‚ 5. Very comfortable
XIII.        To what degree have the skills you learned in this treatment program been accepted by the people in your family (e.g.‚ mother/father‚ adult siblings‚ other extended relatives)
1. not accepted‚ 2. Somewhat not accepted‚ 3. Neutral‚ 4. Somewhat accepted‚ 5. Very accepted
XIV.        To what degree have the skills you learned in this treatment program been accepted by the people in your community (e.g.‚ neighbors‚ other school/Head start parent‚ friends)
1. not accepted‚ 2. Somewhat not accepted‚ 3. Neutral‚ 4. Somewhat accepted‚ 5. Very accepted
 XV.        To what degree feel that the skills you have learned in this program are consistent with your religious‚ or spiritual upbringing and values
1. not consistent‚ 2. Somewhat inconsistent‚ 3. Neutral‚ 4. Somewhat consistent‚ 5. Very consistent

Brestan‚ E.‚ Eyberg‚ S. M. Boggs‚ S. R.‚ & Algina‚ J. (1997). Parent-Child Interaction Therapy: Parents' Perceptions of Untreated Siblings. Child & Family BehaviorTherapy‚ 19‚ 13-28.

Brestan‚ E. V. & Eyberg‚ S. M. (1998). Effective psychosocial treatments of conduct disorderedchildren and adolescents: 29 years‚ 82 studies‚ 5‚272 kids. Journal ofClinical Child Psychology‚ 27‚ 180-189.

Brestan‚ E.‚ Jacobs‚ J.‚ Rayfield‚ A.‚ & Eyberg‚ S.M. (1999). A consumer satisfaction measure for parent-child treatments and its relationship to measures of child behavior change. Behavior Therapy‚ 30‚ 17-30.

Brestan‚ E.‚ Eyberg‚ S. M. Boggs‚ S. R.‚ Jacobs‚ J.‚ et al. (2005). Outcomes of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy: A Comparison of Treatment Completers and Study dr‎opouts One to Three Years Later. Child & Family Behavior Therapy; 26(4): 1-22

Shacklett Reeve‚ Cassie‚ "Efficacy of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy with the Use of In-Room Coaching" (2014). Dissertations. Paper 313. http://scholarworks.wmich.edu/dissertations