Health Utilities Index (HUI)

HUI2 Multi-Attribute Health Status Classification System
Sensation
1.    Able to see‚ hear and speak normally for age.
2.    Requires equipment to see or hear or speak.
3.    Sees‚ hears‚ or speaks with limitations even with equipment.
4.    Blind‚ deaf or mute.
Mobility
1.    Able to walk‚ bend‚ lift‚ jump‚ and run normally for age.
2.    Walks‚ bends‚ lifts‚ jumps‚ or runs with some limitations but does not require help.
3.    Requires mechanical equipment (such as canes‚ crutches‚ braces or wheelchair) to walk or get around independently.
4.    Requires the help of another person to walk or get around and requires mechanical equipment as well.
5.    Unable to control or use arms and legs.
Emotion
1.    Generally happy and free from worry.
2.    Occasionally fretful‚ angry‚ irritable‚ anxious‚ depressed‚ or suffering “night terrors”.
3.    Often fretful‚ angry‚ irritable‚ anxious‚ depressed‚ or suffering “night terrors”.
4.    Almost always fretful‚ angry‚ irritable‚ anxious‚ depressed.
5.    Extremely fretful‚ angry‚ irritable‚ anxious or depressed usually requiring hospitalization or psychiatric institutional care.
Cognition
1.    Learns and remembers school work normally for age.
2.    Learns and remembers school work more slowly than classmates as judged by parents and/or teachers.
3.    Learns and remembers very slowly and usually requires special educational assistance.
4.    Unable to learn and remember.
Self-Care
1.    Eats‚ bathes‚ dresses‚ and uses the toilet normally for age.
2.    Eats‚ bathes‚ dresses‚ or uses the toilet independently with difficulty.
3.    Requires mechanical equipment to eat‚ bathe‚ dress‚ or use the toilet independently.
4.    Requires the help of another person to eat‚ bathe‚ dress‚ or use the toilet.
Pain
1.    Free of pain and discomfort.
2.    Occasional pain. Discomfort relieved by non-prescription drugs or self-control activity without disruption of normal activities.
3.    Frequent pain. Discomfort relieved by oral medicines with occasional disruption of normal activities.
4.    Frequent pain; frequent disruption of normal activities. Discomfort requires prescription narcotics for relief.
5.    Severe pain. Pain not relieved by drugs and constantly disrupts normal activities.
Fertility
1.    Able to have children with a fertile spouse.
2.    Difficulty in ha‎ving children with a fertile spouse.
3.    Unable to have children with a fertile spouse.
HUI3 Multi-Attribute Health Status Classification System
Vision
1.    Able to see well enough to read ordinary newsprint and recognize a friend on the other side of the street‚ without glasses or contact lenses.
2.    Able to see well enough to read ordinary newsprint and recognize a friend on the other side of the street‚ but with glasses.
3.    Able to read ordinary newsprint with or without glasses but unable to recognize a friend on the other side of the street‚ even with glasses.
4.    Able to recognize a friend on the other side of the street with or without glasses but unable to read ordinary newsprint‚ even with glasses.
5.    Unable to read ordinary newsprint and unable to recognize a friend on the other side of the street‚ even with glasses.
6.    Unable to see at all.
Hearing
1.    Able to hear what is said in a group conversation with at least three other people‚ without a hearing aid.
2.    Able to hear what is said in a conversation with one other person in a quiet room without a hearing aid‚ but requires a hearing aid to hear what is said in a group conversation with at least three other people.
3.    Able to hear what is said in a conversation with one other person in a quiet room with a hearing aid‚ and able to hear what is said in a group conversation with at least three other people‚ with a hearing aid.
4.    Able to hear what is said in a conversation with one other person in a quiet room‚ without a hearing aid‚ but unable to hear what is said in a group conversation with at least three other people even with a hearing aid.
5.    Able to hear what is said in a conversation with one other person in a quiet room with a hearing aid‚ but unable to hear what is said in a group conversation with at least three other people even with a hearing aid.
6.    Unable to hear at all.
Speech
1.    Able to be understood completely when speaking with strangers or friends.
2.    Able to be understood partially when speaking with strangers but able to be understood completely when speaking with people who know me well.
3.    Able to be understood partially when speaking with strangers or people who know me well.
4.    Unable to be understood when speaking with strangers but able to be understood partially by people who know me well.
5.    Unable to be understood when speaking to other people (or unable to speak at all).
Ambulation
1.    Able to walk around the neighbourhood without difficulty‚ and without walking equipment.
2.    Able to walk around the neighbourhood with difficulty; but does not require walking equipment or the help of another person.
3.    Able to walk around the neighbourhood with walking equipment‚ but without the help of another person.
4.    Able to walk only short distances with walking equipment‚ and requires a wheelchair to get around the neighbourhood.
5.    Unable to walk alone‚ even with walking equipment. Able to walk short distances with the help of another person‚ and requires a wheelchair to get around the neighbourhood.
6.    Cannot walk at all.
Dexterity
1.    Full use of two hands and ten fingers.
2.    Limitations in the use of hands or fingers‚ but does not require special tools or help of another person.
3.    Limitations in the use of hands or fingers‚ is independent with use of special tools (does not require the help of another person).
4.    Limitations in the use of hands or fingers‚ requires the help of another person for some tasks (not independent even with use of special tools).
5.    Limitations in use of hands or fingers‚ requires the help of another person for most tasks (not independent even with use of special tools).
6.    Limitations in use of hands or fingers‚ requires the help of another person for all tasks (not independent even with use of special tools).
Emotion
1.    Happy and interested in life.
2.    Somewhat happy.
3.    Somewhat unhappy.
4.    Very unhappy.
5.    So unhappy that life is not worthwhile.
Cognition
1.    Able to remember most things‚ think clearly and solve day to day problems.
2.    Able to remember most things‚ but have a little difficulty when trying to think and solve day to day problems.
3.    Somewhat forgetful‚ but able to think clearly and solve day to day problems.
4.    Somewhat forgetful‚ and have a little difficulty when trying to think or solve day to day problems.
5.    Very forgetful‚ and have great difficulty when trying to think or solve day to day problems.
6.    Unable to remember anything at all‚ and unable to think or solve day to day problems.
Pain
1.    Free of pain and discomfort.
2.    Mild to moderate pain that prevents no activities.
3.    Moderate pain that prevents a few activities.
4.    Moderate to severe pain that prevents some activities.
5.    Severe pain that prevents most activities.
 
HUI-2= 1.06 (Sensation * Mobility * Emotion * Cognition * Self-Care * Pain * Fertility) – 0.06
HUI-3= 1.371(Vision * Hearing * Speech * Ambulation * Dexterity * Emotion * Cognition * Pain) – 0.371
 
 

Feeny‚ David.‚ Furlong‚ William.‚ Boyle‚ Michael.‚ and Torrance‚ George W. (1995) “Multi-Attribute Health Status Classification Systems: Health Utilities Index.” PharmacoEconomics‚ 7(6); 490-502.

Feeny‚ David H.‚ George W. Torrance‚ and William J. Furlong‚ “Health Utilities Index‚” Chapter 26 In Bert Spilker‚ ed. Quality of Life and Pharmacoeconomics in Clinical Trials. Second Edition. Philadelphia: Lippincott-Raven Press‚ 1996‚ pp 239-252.

Torrance‚ George W.‚ David H. Feeny‚ William J. Furlong‚ Ronald D. Barr‚ Yueming Zhang‚ and Qinan Wang. (1996). “Multi-Attribute Preference Functions for A Comprehensive Health Status Classification System: Health Utilities Index Mark 2.” Medical Care‚ Vol. 34‚ No. 7‚ July‚ pp 702-722.

Furlong‚ William J.‚ Feeny‚ David H.‚ Torrance‚ George W.‚ Barr‚ Ronald D. (2001). The Health Utilities Index (HUI®) System for Assessing Health-Related Quality of Life in Clinical Studies‚ Mcma‎ster University Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis Research Working Paper Series # 01-02.

Horsman‚ John.‚ Furlong‚ William.‚ Feeny‚ David.‚ Torrance‚ George. (2003). “The Health Utilities Index (HUI®): concepts‚ measurement properties and applications”. Health and Quality of Life Outcomes. 1: 54.

McDowell‚ Ian. (2006). Measuring Health: A Guide to Rating Scales and Questionnaires‚ Third Edition. OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS