Body Appreciation Scale (BAS)

Body Appreciation Scale-2 (BAS)

Tracy L. Tylkaa.‚ & Nichole L. Wood-BarcalowbaDepartment. (2015).

 
1.    I respect my body.
2.    I feel good about my body.
3.    On the whole‚ I am satisfied with my body.
4.    Despite its flaws‚ I accept my body for what it is.
5.    I feel that my body has at least some good qualities.
6.    I take a positive attitude towards my body.
7.    I am attentive to my body’s needs.

8.    My self worth is independent of my body shape or weight.

9.    I do not focus a lot of energy being concerned with my weight or body shape.

10.My feelings toward my body are positive‚ for the most part.

11.I engage in healthy behaviors to take care of my body.

12.I do not allow unrealistically thin images of women presented in the media to affect my attitudes toward my body.

13.Despite its imperfections‚ I still like my body.
 

1.    I respect my body.

2.    I feel good about my body.

3.    I feel that my body has at least some good qualities.

4.    I take a positive attitude towards my body.

5.    I am attentive to my body’s needs.

6.    I feel love for my body.

7.    I appreciate the different and unique ch‎aracteristics of my body.

8.    My behavior reveals my positive attitude toward my body; for example‚ I hold my head high and smile.

9.    I am comfortable in my body.

10.I feel like I am beautiful even if I am different from media images of attractive people (e.g.‚ models‚ actresses/actors).

 

1=Never‚ 2=Seldom‚ 3=Sometimes‚ 4=Often‚ 5=Always

 

This instrument can be found at: The Body Appreciation Scale: Development and psychometric evaluation 

 

Avalos‚ L.‚ Tylka‚ T.L.‚ & Wood-Barcalow‚ N. (2005). The Body Appreciation Scale: Development and psychometric evaluation. Body Image 2‚ 285-297.

Avalos‚ L. C.‚ & Tylka‚ T. L. (2006). Exploring a model of intuitive eat-ing with college women. Journal of Counseling Psychology‚ 53‚ 486–497.

Tylka‚ T. L.‚ & Wood-Barcalow‚ N. (2015). The Body Appreciation Scale-2: Item refinement and psychometric evaluation. Body Image 12‚ 53–67.

Tylka‚ T. L. (2011a). Positive psychology perspectives on body image. In T. F. Cash &L. Smolak (Eds.)‚ Body image: A handbook of science‚ practice‚ and prevention (2nded.‚ pp. 56–64). New York: Guilford Press.

Tylka‚ T. L. (2011b). Refinement of the tripartite influence model for men: Dualbody image pathways to body change behaviors. Body Image‚ 8‚ 199–207.http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bodyim.2011.04.008

Tylka‚ T. L. (2013). Evidence for the Body Appreciation Scale’s measurement equiv-alence/invariance between U.S. college women and men. Body Image‚ 10‚415–418. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bodyim.2013.02.006

Tylka‚ T. L.‚ & Augustus-Horvath‚ C. L. (2011). Fighting self-objectification in pre-vention and intervention contexts. In R. M. Calogero‚ S. Tantleff-Dunn & J. K.Thompson (Eds.)‚ Self-objectification in women: Causes‚ consequences‚ and counteractions (pp. 187–214). Washington‚ DC: American Psychological Association.

Tylka‚ T. L.‚ Bergeron‚ D.‚ & Schwartz‚ J. P. (2005). Development and psychometric evaluation of the Male Body Attitudes Scale (MBAS). Body Image‚ 2‚ 161–175.http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bodyim.2005.03.001

Tylka‚ T. L.‚ & Kroon Van Diest‚ A. M. (2013). The Intuitive Eating Scale-2: Item refinement and psychometric evaluation with college women and men. Journal ofCounseling Psychology‚ 60‚ 137–153.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0030893