Vaux Social Support Record

Vaux Social Support Record
Vaux‚ 1988
 
"Social Support" comprehensively evaluates research and theory from the perspective of both the scientist and human service provider. This work is sure to become the standard reference on the social support for the psychologist‚ sociologist‚ and service provider concerned with social factors in distress and wellbeing.
The volume first examines the roots of‚ and current debates in‚ the conceptualization of social support. An integrative perspective is then proposed‚ presenting social support as a transactional process involving network resources‚ behavior‚ and appraisals. Further chapters review measures of support and develop the transactional model—examining links between resources‚ behavior‚ and appraisals‚ and exploring personal‚ social‚ and ecological influences on the support process. The book then turns to general models of support effects on psychological well-being‚ evaluating empirical evidence‚ noting problems with these models‚ and subsequently proposing more specific models of support mechanisms. The role of social support in social epidemiology is examined‚ as are neglected issues regarding developmental aspects of support across the life span. Interventions involving social support are the focus of the later chapters. Problems‚ both scientific and ideological‚ are discussed; prospects for interventions at different points in the support process and at various social levels are outlined; finally‚ support interventions are illustrated through extant programs. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA‚ all rights reserved)
 
1. At school‚ there are adults I can talk to‚ who care about my feelings and what happens to me.
2. At school‚ there are adults I can talk to‚ who give good suggestions and advice about my problems.
3. At school‚ there are adults who help me with practical problems‚ like helping me get somewhere or helping with a project.
4. There are people in my family I can talk to‚ who care about my feelings and what happens to me.
5. There are people in my family I can talk to‚ who give good suggestions and advice about my problems.
6. There are people in my family who help me with practical problems‚ like helping me get somewhere or help me with a job or project.
7. I have friends I can talk to‚ who care about my feelings and what happens to me.
8. I have friends I can talk to‚ who give good suggestions and advice about my problems.
9. I have friends who help me with practical problems‚ like how to get somewhere‚ or help me with a job.
 
These items measure satisfaction with perceived emotional advice‚ guidance‚ and practical social support. Youths are asked to indicate how much they agree or disagree with a series of statements.
This instrument can be found on page 152 of Measuring Violence-Related Attitudes‚ Behaviors‚ and Influences Among Youths: A Compendium of Assessment Tools‚ available online at: http://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/pdf/YV_Compendium.pdf .
 
Elementary school students‚ grades 1-6.
 
Not at all =1‚ Some =2‚ A lot =3
Point values‚ as indicated above‚ are summed. A high score indicates a high level of social support. A low score indicates a low level of social support.
 

Vaux A. Social support: theory‚ research‚ and intervention. New York‚ NY: Praeger‚ 1988.