Physical Appearance-Related Teasing Scale (PARTS)

1. When you were a child‚ did you feel that your peers were staring at because you were overweight?
2. When you were a child‚ did you ever feel like people were making fun of you because of your weight?
3. Were you ridiculed as a child about being overweight?
4. When you were a child‚ did people make jokes about you being too big?
5. When you were a child‚ were you laughed at for trying  out for sports because you were too heavy?
6. Did your brother(s) or other male relatives call you names like “fatso” when they got angry at you?
7. Did your father ever make jokes that referred to your weight?
8. Did other kids call you derogatory names that related to your size or weight?
9. Did you ever feel like people were pointing at you because of your size or weight?
10. Were you the brunt of family jokes because of your weight?
11. Did people point you out of a crowd because of your weight?
12. Did you ever hear your classmate snicker when you walked into the classroom alone?
13. When you were growing up‚ did people say you dressed funny? 
14. Did people say you had funny teeth?
15. Did kids call you funny looking?
16. Did other kids tease you about wearing clothes that didn’t match or were out of style?
17. Did other kids ever make jokes about your hair?
18. When you were a child were you scoffed at for looking like a weakling? 
 
This instrument can be found on pages 120-121 of The Effects of Ambiguous Appearance-related Feedback on Body Image‚ Mood States‚ and Intentions to Use Body Changes Strategies in College Women. Available online at:  http://usf.sobek.ufl.edu/content/SF/S0/02/68/04/00001/E14-SFE0002487.pdf
 
1=Never‚ 2‚ 3‚ 4‚ 5=Frequently
 

Thompson‚ J. K.‚ Fabian‚ L. J.‚ Moulton‚ D. O.‚ Dunn‚ M. E.‚ & Altabe‚ M. N. (1991).Development and Validation of the Physical Appearance Related Teasing Scale.Journal of Personality Assessment‚ 56(3)‚ 513-521.

Herbozo‚ Sylvia.‚ (2007). The Effects of Ambiguous Appearance-related Feedback on Body Image‚ Mood States‚ and Intentions to Use Body Changes Strategies in College Women. University of South Florida‚ College of Arts and Sciences‚ Department of Psychology.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Pin It on Pinterest