Hwalek-Senstock Elder Abuse Screening Test (HSEAST)

The Hwalek-Senstock Elder Abuse Screening Test (HSEAST) is a tool developed by the National Center on Elder Abuse (NCEA) to help identify and assess the risk of elder abuse. It is designed to be used by health and social service professionals and other caregivers in order to identify elder abuse and neglect. The HSEAST is a brief questionnaire that consists of 12 questions that focus on physical, psychological, financial, and neglectful abuse, as well as other forms of mistreatment. The questions are designed to be answered by the elder or by someone close to them, such as a family member or caregiver. The test is divided into four sections, each of which focuses on a different type of elder abuse. The first section assesses physical abuse, including hitting, pushing, or other forms of physical harm. The second section assesses psychological abuse, such as verbal threats, humiliation, or isolation. The third section assesses financial abuse, including stealing or misusing money or possessions. The fourth section assesses neglect, including failure to provide basic needs such as food, shelter, or medical care. The HSEAST is intended to be used as a screening tool, not as a diagnostic tool. It is not intended to replace a full medical or psychological assessment. However, it can be used to identify potential signs of elder abuse and neglect that may warrant further investigation. The HSEAST is a valuable tool for health and social service professionals, caregivers, and family members to help identify and assess the risk of elder abuse.

1.    Do you have anyone who spends time with you‚ taking you shopping or to the doctor?

2.    Are you helping to support someone?
3.    Are you sad or lonely often?
4.    Who makes decisions about your life—like how you should live or where you should live?
5.    Do you feel uncomfortable with anyone in your family?
6.    Can you take your own medication and get around by yourself?
7.    Do you feel that nobody wants you around?
8.    Does anyone in your family drink a lot?
9.    Does someone in your family make you stay in bed or tell you you’re sick when you know you’re not?
10.Has anyone forced you to do things you didn’t want to do?
11.Has anyone taken things that belong to you without your O.K.?
12.Do you trust most of the people in your family?
13.Does anyone tell you that you give them too much trouble?
14.Do you have enough privacy at home?
15.Has anyone close to you tried to hurt you or harm you recently?
Violation of Personal Rights or Direct Abuse
1. Does someone else make decisions about your life – like how you should live or where you should live?
2. Does someone in your family make you stay in bed or tell you you’re sick when you know you’re not?
3. Has anyone forced you to do things you didn’t want to do?
4. Has anyone taken things that belong to you without your OK?
5. Has anyone close to you tried to hurt you or harm you recently?
ch‎aracteristics of Vulnerability
6. Do you have anyone who spends time with you‚ taking you shopping or to the doctor?
7. Are you sad or lonely often?
8. Can you take your own medication and get around by yourself?
Potentially Abusive Situations
9. Are you helping to support someone?
10. Do you feel uncomfortable with anyone in your family
11. Do you feel that nobody wants you around?
12. Does anyone in your family drink a lot?
13. Do you trust most of the people in your family?
14. Does anyone tell you that you give them too much trouble?
16. Do you have enough privacy at home?
 
A response of “no” to items 6‚ 8‚ 13‚ and 15 and a response of “yes” to all other score in the abused direction.
 

Neale AV‚ Hwalek MA‚ Scott RO‚ Sengstock MC‚ Stahl C. (1991). Validation of the Hwalek-Sengstock Elder Abuse Screening Test. Journal of Applied Gerontology; 10(4): 406-418.

Nelson. Heidi‚ Nygren. Peggy‚ McInerney. Yasmin‚. (2004). Screening for Family and Intimate Partner Violence. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Systematic Evidence Review; 28. www.ahrq.gov