Coping Health Inventory for Parents (CHIP)

1.    Trying to maintain family stability.
2.    Engaging in relationships and friendships which help me to feel important and appreciated.
3.    Trusting my spouse (or former spouse) to help support me and my child(ren).
4.    Sleeping.
5.    Talking with the medical staff(nurses‚social worker‚ etc.) whenwe visit the medicalcenter.
6.    Believing that my child will get better
7.    Working‚ outside employment
8.    Showing that I am strong.
9.    Purchasing gifts for myself and/or other family members.
10.Talking with other individual/parents in my situation.
11.Taking good care of all the child’s special needs at home.
12.Eating
13.Getting away myself
14.Getting other members of the family to help with chores and tasks at home
15.Believing in God.
16.Talking with Doctor about my concerns about my child(ren) with the medical condition.
17.Believing that the medical center/hospital has my family’s best interest in mind.
18.Building a closer relationship with people.
19.Develop my self as a person.
20.Talking with other parents in the same type of situation and learning about their experiences.
21.Doing things together as a family (involving all members of the family).
22.Investing time and energy in my job.
23.Believing that my child is getting the best medical care possible.
24.Entertaining friends in our home.
25.Reading about how other persons in my situation handle things.
26.Doing things with family relatives.
27.Becoming more self reliant and dependent.
28.Telling myself that I have many things I should be thankful for.
29.Concentrating on hobbies (art‚ music‚ jogging‚ etc.)
30.Explaining our family situation to friend and neighbors so they will understand us.
31.Allowing myself to get angry.
32.Encouraging child(ren) with medical condition to be more independent.
33.Keeping myself in shape and well groomed.
34.Involvement in social activities (parties‚ etc.) with friends.
35.Going out with my spouse on a regular basis.
36.Investing myself in my child(ren).
37.Being sure prescribed medical treatments for child(ren) are carried out at home on a daily basis.
38.Building a closer relationship with my spouse.
39.Talking to someone (not professional counselor/doctor) about how I feel.
40.Reading more about the medical problem which concerns me.
41.Talking over personal feelings and concerns with spouse.
42.Being able to get away from the home care tasks and responsibilities for some relief.
43.ha‎ving my child with the medical condition seen at the clinic/hospital on a regular basis.
44.Believing that things will always work out.
45.Doing things with my children.
 
 
0 = Not helpful‚ 1 = Minimally helpful‚ 2 = Moderately helpful‚ 3= Extremely helpful
For each Coping Behavior you Did Not use‚ please record your “Reason”. Please Record this by checking □ one of the reasons: Chose not to use it or Not Possible
Family integration‚ cooperation‚ and optimism Definition of the Situation (1‚ 3‚ 6‚ 8‚ 11‚ 13‚ 23‚ 26‚ 31‚ 36‚ 38‚ 41‚ 43‚ 44‚ and 45); Maintaining social support‚ self-esteem‚ and psychological stability (2‚ 4‚ 7‚ 9‚ 12‚ 14‚ 17‚ 19‚ 22‚ 24‚ 27‚ 29‚ 32‚ 33‚ 34‚ 37‚39‚ and 42); and Understanding the health care situation through communication with other parents and communication with the health care team (5‚ 10‚ 15‚ 20‚ 25‚ 30‚ 35‚ and 40)
 
This instrument can be found at: Fischer‚ Joel.‚ Corcoran‚ Kevin J. (2007 ). Measures for Clinical Practice and research: A sourcebook. (4th ed.). NY. Oxford University Pr. Vol. 1‚ Page (s): 232-235.
 

McCubbin‚ H. (1979). Integrating coping behaviour in family stress theory. Journal of Marriage and the Family‚ 41‚ 237-244.

McCubbin‚ H. I.‚ McCubbin‚ M. A.‚ Nevin‚ R.‚ & Cauble‚ E. (1981). Coping Health

Inventory for Parents (CHIP). In M. H.I.‚ A. I. Thompson & M. A. McCubbin (Eds.)‚ Family assessment: Resiliency‚ coping and Adaptation: Inventories for research and practice. Madison: University of Wisconsin.

McCubbin‚ H.‚ & McCubbin‚ H.‚ Patterson‚ J. & Cauble‚ A. (1983). CHIP-Coping Health Inventory for Parents: An assessment of parental coping patterns in the care of the chronically ill child. Journal of Marriage and the Family‚ 45‚ 359-370.

McCubbin‚ Hamilton I. (1983). CHIP—Coping Health Inventory for Parents: An assessment of parental coping patterns in the care of the chronically ill child.

McCubbin‚ H. I.‚ Cubin‚ M. A.‚ Patterson‚ J. M.‚ Cauble‚ A. E.‚ Wilson‚ L. R.‚ & Warwick‚ W. (1983). CHIP-Coping Health Inventory for Parents: An assessment of parental coping patterns in the care of the chronically ill child. Journal of Marriage and the Family‚ 20‚ 359-370.

McCubbin H‚ McCubbin M. Family stress theory and assessment. In: McCubbin HI‚ Thomson AI‚ editors. Family assessment inventories for research and practice. Madison: University of Wisconsin; 1991. p. 294-312.

McCubbin‚ H. I.‚ McCubbin‚ M. A.‚ Nevin‚ R.‚ & Cauble‚ E. (1996). Coping Heath Inventory for Parents (CHIP). In M. H.I.‚ A. I. Thompson & M. M.A. (Eds.)‚ Family assessment: Resiliency‚ coping‚ and adaptation-Inventories for research and practice (pp. 407-453). Madison: WI: University of Wisconsin System.

McCubbin et al‚ (1983‚ 1991). Coping Health Inventory for Parents (CHIP). IN Fischer‚ Joel.‚ Corcoran‚ Kevin J. (2007 ). Measures for Clinical Practice and research: A sourcebook. (4th ed.). NY. Oxford University Pr. Vol. 1‚ Page (s): 232-235.

Aguilar-Vafaie‚ Maria E. (2008). Coping-Health Inventory for Parents: Assessing Coping Among Iranian Parents in the Care of Children With Cancer and Introductory Development of an Adapted Iranian Coping-Health Inventory for Parents. Children’s Health Care‚ 37(4)‚ 237-260

 
 

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