Consistency of Discipline —Rochester Youth Development Study

 Parent Items
1. How often do you give up when you ask your child to do something and he/she doesn’t do it?
2. How often does your child get away with things?
3. When your child is punished‚ how often does the punishment work?
4. How often do you feel that you can correct your children’s behavior?
5. Once a punishment has been decided‚ how often can your child get out of it?
6. How often do you have to ask your child to do the same thing more than once?
7. How often does your child get punished sometimes‚ but not other times‚ for doing the same thing?
Youth Items
1. Once your parent decides a punishment‚ how often can you get out of it?
2. How often do you get away with things?
3. How often do you get punished sometimes‚ but not other times‚ for doing the same thing?
4. How often does your parent have to ask you to do the same thing more than once?
5. When you get punished‚ how much does the kind of punishment you get depend on your parent’s mood?
■ 1 Totally on mood ■ 2 Mostly on mood ■ 3 About half on mood half on your behavior ■ 4 Mostly on your behavior ■ 5 Totally on your behavior
 
 
 
  • Punishment
  • Discipline
 
This instrument can be found on pages 284-285 of Measuring Violence-Related Attitudes‚ Behaviors‚ and Influences Among Youths: A Compendium of Assessment Tools‚ available online at: http://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/pdf/YV_Compendium.pdf
 
 
Point values are assigned as follows:
Often=4
Sometimes=3
Seldom=2
Never Just like=1
Parent and youth items should be scored separately. Point values are summed and then divided by the total number of items (7 for parent; 5 for youth). Intended range of scores is between 1 and 4 (parent)‚ and 1 and 4.2 (youth). Higher scores indicate a greater frequency of positive parenting.
 

Stern‚ S. B.‚ Smith‚ C. A.‚ & Jang‚ S. J. (1999). Urban families and adolescent mental health. Social Work Research‚ 23(1).

Thornberry‚ T. P.‚ Lizotte‚ A. J.‚ Krohn‚ M. D.‚ Farnworth‚ M.‚ & Jang‚ S. J. (1991). Testing interactional theory: An examination of reciprocal-causal relationships among family‚ school‚ and delinquency. Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology‚ 82‚ 3-35