Comprehensive Misconduct Inventory (CMI – 50)

Background:

The association between psychopathy and self-reported misconduct has been established in offender samples and non-offender samples. Psychopathy, as measured by the SRP-II, is the best predictor of all forms of misconduct included in the CMI. The 50-item Comprehensive Misconduct Inventory (CMI-50) instrument covers a wide variety of misbehaviors from mild to extreme.  Factoring yields five clusters: Criminal Behavior, Driving Misconduct, Bullying, Drug & Alcohol abuse and Anti-Authority Aggression.

Psychometrics:

For information on psychometrics see: Williams, K.M., Paulhus, D.L., & Hare, R.D. (2007).  The four facet structure of psychopathy in non-forensic samples. Journal of Personality Assessment, 88, 118-129.

Author of Tool:

Paulhus, D. L.

Key references:

Williams, K., McAndrew, A., Learn, T., Harms, P., & Paulhus, D.L. (August, 2001).  Dark Personalities: Anti-social behavior and entertainment preferences.  Presented at meeting of the American Psychological Association, San Francisco.

Williams, K.M., Paulhus, D.L., & Hare, R.D. (2007).  The four facet structure of psychopathy in non-forensic samples. Journal of Personality Assessment, 88, 118-129.

Primary use / Purpose:

Assesses forms of misconduct, useful in predicting psychopathy.

 

Comprehensive Misconduct Inventory (CMI – 50)

Although everyone misbehaves as a teenager, we all do it in different ways. Write a number in each space provided.  Your answers will not be stored with your name, so please be totally honest.

 

During your high school years, how many times did you:

  •           purposely damage or destroy property that did not belong to
  •           break into a
  •           steal something from a store.
  •           attack someone with a
  •           throw objects (such as rocks, snowballs, or bottles) at cars or
  •           carry a hidden
  •           assault someone and injure him/her (including a sports setting).
  •           pay for sex with someone (including phone sex).
  •           join a gang that was known to commit crimes.
  •           sell marijuana or hashish ("pot", "grass", "hash").
  •           copy answers from someone else’s test at
  •           get totally
  •           steal money from your
  •           hit someone with your hand or
  •           drive while impaired by alcohol or
  •           sell hard drugs, such as heroin, cocaine, and LSD.
  •           take a vehicle for a ride without the owner's permission.
  •           buy alcohol while underage.
  •           use physical force in order to get someone to have sex with
  •           use physical force to get money or things from
  •           sneak into a movie, bus, or subway without paying.
  •           steal something at school, such as someone's jacket or
  •           participate in a street race as a
  •           break into a building to steal something or mess it up.
  •           receive a speeding
  •           sneak out at night without your parents’
  •           get suspended from
  •           kick someone in
  •           swear at adults (e.g. parents, salesclerks, telephone solicitors, teachers).
  •           purposely harass someone on the telephone or on email.
  •           yell at other drivers so they could hear
  •           buy or sell goods you knew to be
  •           spend a night (or more) in jail.
  •           plagiarize (copy) a school
  •           use prescription drugs (e.g. valium, codeine) to the level of
  •           use hallucinogens ("LSD", "Mescaline", "Peyote", "Acid").
  •           use marijuana-hashish ("pot", "grass", "hash").
  •           use heroin ("Horse", "Smack").
  •           use cocaine (“coke”).
  •           use ecstasy (“X”).
  •           use other illegal drugs (Uppers or Downers).
  •           lie about your age, g., to buy alcohol or get into a club.
  •           run away from

These days, in AVERAGE MONTH month, how often do you do the following:

  •           have more than one alcoholic drink at a
  •           use soft
  •           honk in anger at other
  •           say cruel things to
  •           shove or slap
  •           appear obviously drunk in public places.
  •           ridicule someone who is
  •           play violent
  •           park in an illegal parking
  •           drive 20 miles over the speed limit
  •           argue with your
  •           tail-gate someone on
  •           do things just to bother authority figures (e.g., teachers, parents, other adults).
  •           download illegally copied programs from the
  •           drive a motor

CMI - 58 Scoring Key: 

Six subscale scores can be obtained by calculating the mean of the following items.

(Note that all items must be standardized prior to summing):

  • Soft Drug Abuse (SDA) = 12, 15, 18, 35, 37, 44, 45, 49 (8 items)
  • Hard Drug Abuse (HDA) = 16, 36, 38, 39, 40, 41 (6 items)
  • Minor Criminality (MC) = 3, 5, 8, 11, 21, 22, 27, 32, 34, 42 (10 items)
  • Serious Criminality (SC) = 1, 2, 4, 6, 9, 10, 14, 19, 24, 33 (10 items)
  • Driving Misbehavior (DM) = 17, 23, 25, 31, 46, 53, 55 (7 items)
  • Bullying/Harassing (BH) = 7, 20, 28, 30, 47, 48, 50, 51 (8 items)
  • Anti-Authority Misbehavior (AA) = 13, 26, 29, 43, 52, 54, 56, 57 (8 items)

Notes:

  • The items may be combined to form an Overall Misbehavior
  • SDA and HDA items may be combined into a general Substance Abuse
  • MC and SC items may be combined to form a general Criminality
  • Items 1 - 43 may be combined to form a High School Misbehavior
  • Items 44- 57 may be combined to form a Current Misbehavior index.
  • Item 58 can be used to control the DM factor for amount of driving.
  • The seven subscales were developed from (oblique) factor analyses of data from students at the University of British Columbia:

 

Citations:

Williams, K., McAndrew, A., Learn, T., Harms, P., & Paulhus, D.L. (August, 2001). Dark Personalities: Anti-social behavior and entertainment preferences. Presented at meeting of the American Psychological Association, San Francisco.

Williams, K.M., Paulhus, D.L., & Hare, R.D. (2007). The four facet structure of psychopathy in non- forensic samples. Journal of Personality Assessment, 88, 118-129.