Collective Self-esteem Scale

Background:

Social identity theory as developed by Tajfel and Turner argues that there are two distinct aspects of the self-concept: personal identity and social identity. Although many self-esteem measures are available in the literature, they all focus on  individuals’ evaluation of their personal identity, whether in private or interpersonal domains.  The Collective Self-esteem Scale was constructed to assess individual differences in collective, rather than personal, self-esteem, with four subscales (Membership esteem, Public collective self-esteem, Private collective self-esteem, and Importance to Identity).

Psychometrics:

Evidence for reliability and validity of the scale was provided by three studies, suggesting that the scale can be a useful research tool (see Luhtanen, R., & Crocker, J. (1992). A collective self-esteem scale: Self-evaluation of one’s social identity. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 18, 302-318.   (seeLuhtanen, R., & Crocker, J. (1992). A collective self-esteem scale: Self-evaluation of one’s social identity. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 18, 302-318 for full description of psychometric properties).

Author of Tool:

Luhtanen, R. K., & Crocker, J

Key references:

Luhtanen, R., & Crocker, J. (1992). A collective self-esteem scale: Self-evaluation of one’s social identity. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 18, 302-318.

Primary use / Purpose:

The scale is designed to assess four aspects of evaluations of one’s social groups or identities: public, private, membership and importance. It has been translated into a number of languages and can be adapted to assess collective self-esteem for a wide variety of identities.

Collective Self-esteem Scale

INSTRUCTIONS: We are all members of different social groups or social categories. Some of such social groups or categories pertain to gender, race, religion, nationality, ethnicity, and socioeconomic class. We would like you to consider your memberships in those particular groups or categories, and respond to the following statements on the basis of how you feel about those groups and your memberships in them. There are no right or wrong answers to any of these statements; we are interested in your honest reactions and opinions. Please read each statement carefully, and respond by using the following scale from 1 to 7:

 

Strongly Disagree 

Disagree

Disagree Somewhat 

Neutral

Agree Somewhat 

Agree

Strongly Agree
1.I am a worthy member of the social groups I belong to.1234567
2.I often regret that I belong to some of the social groups I do.1234567
3.Overall, my social groups are considered good by others.1234567
4.Overall, my group memberships have very little to do with how I feel about myself.1234567
5.I feel I don't have much to offer to the social groups I belong to.1234567
6.In general, I'm glad to be a member of the social groups I belong to.1234567
7.Most people consider my social groups, on the average, to be more ineffective than other social groups.1234567
8.The social groups I belong to are an important reflection of who I am.1234567
9.I am a cooperative participant in the social groups I belong to.1234567
10.Overall, I often feel that the social groups of which I am a member are not worthwhile.1234567
11.In general, others respect the social groups that I am a member of.1234567
12.The social groups I belong to are unimportant to my sense of what kind of a person I am.1234567
13.I often feel I'm a useless member of my social groups.1234567
14.I feel good about the social groups I belong to.1234567
15.In general, others think that the social groups I am a member of are unworthy.1234567
16.In general, belonging to social groups is an important part of my self image.1234567