Beliefs about Hitting scale

Beliefs about hitting scale is a concept that has been gaining traction in recent years, particularly in the field of psychology. The concept is based on the idea that people have beliefs about how much physical force is acceptable in different situations. These beliefs can be expressed in terms of a scale, with the lower end of the scale representing the least amount of force acceptable and the higher end representing the most force acceptable. The idea of a hitting scale was first proposed by psychologist Albert Bandura in the late 1960s. Bandura argued that peoples beliefs about acceptable levels of physical force are shaped by a variety of factors, including culture, family values, and personal experiences. He suggested that these beliefs can be measured by asking people to rate how acceptable different levels of physical force are in various situations. Since Banduras initial proposal, the concept of hitting scale has been further developed and studied. Research has found that peoples beliefs about acceptable levels of physical force vary depending on the context of the situation. For example, people tend to view hitting as more acceptable when it is used to discipline a child than when it is used to settle an argument between adults. Research has also found that peoples beliefs about acceptable levels of physical force are related to their attitudes towards violence in general. People who view violence as an acceptable way to resolve conflicts tend to have higher hitting scales than those who view violence as an unacceptable way to resolve conflicts. In addition to its use in research, the concept of hitting scale has also been used to inform public policy. For example, many countries have adopted laws that restrict the use of physical force in certain situations. These laws are often based on the idea that people have different beliefs about what is an acceptable level of physical force in different contexts. Overall, the concept of hitting scale provides an important insight into how people view physical force in different situations. It can help researchers and policymakers better understand the dynamics of violence and how to best address it.
DESCRIPTION
These items measure the perception of adult role models about fighting. Students are asked to circle the response that reflects their thinking. Measures the perceptions of adult role models about fighting.
KEYWORDS
This tool touches on the following keywords:
·         Aggressive
·         Personal Attitudes and Beliefs
·         Peer Relationships
WHERE TO FIND OR DOWNLOAD
This instrument can be found on pages 21 of Measuring Violence-Related Attitudes‚ Behaviors‚ and Influences Among Youths: A Compendium of Assessment Tools‚ available online at: http://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/pdf/YV_Compendium.pdf .
FEES AND REQUIREMENTS
None noted.
AGE RANGE
Middle school students‚ grades 6-8.
HOW TO ADMINISTER AND SCORE
Item 1 is reverse scored. Responses are summed across all items‚ with a possible range of 4 to 16. Higher scores indicate the presence of more non-violent adult role models.
Point values are assigned as follows:
All = 4
Most = 3
Few = 2
None = 1
 
SOURCE
Orpinas P. Skills training and social influences for violence prevention in middle schools. A curriculum evaluation. Doctoral Dissertation. Houston‚ TX: University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston‚ School of Public Health‚ 1993.

Beliefs about Hitting
Thinking about the adults you spend the most time with‚ how many of them would tell you the following?
All Most Few None
1. “If another students hits you‚ hit them back (it is OK to fight).”
2. “If another student wants you to fight‚ you should try to talk your way out of the fight.”
3. “If another student asks you to fight‚ you should tell a teacher or someone older.”
4. “Fighting is not good. There are other ways to solve problems.”