Assessment of disruptive Symptoms (ASD-IV-P)

Background:

The Assessment of disruptive Symptoms-DSM-IV Version – For Parents (ASD-IV-P) is designed to measure the level (i.e low, average, high) of disorders including Conduct Disorder (CD), Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD). This sets it apart from scales which are only capable of making binary diagnoses. This scales ability to demarcate individuals with unusually low levels of characteristics belonging to these disorders -as opposed to high- is unique and has potential for varied usage.

Psychometrics:

The psychometric properties of the Assessment of disruptive Symptoms-DSM-IV Version – For Parents (ASD-IV-P) are discussed in Waschbusch, D. A., Sparkes, S. J., & Northern Partners in Action for Child and Youth Services. (2003).

Author of Tool:

Waschbusch, D. A., Sparkes, S. J., & Northern Partners in Action for Child and Youth Services.

Key references:

Waschbusch, D. A., Sparkes, S. J., & Northern Partners in Action for Child and Youth Services. (2003). Rating Scale Assessment of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD): Is there a Normal Distribution and Does it Matter? Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment, 21(261). DOI: 10.1177/073428290302100303

Primary use / Purpose:

The Assessment of disruptive Symptoms-DSM-IV Version – For Parents (ASD-IV-P) is a Likert scale developed to measure symptoms of Conduct Disorder (CD), Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD). The ASD-IV-P, Rather than giving simple yes/no diagnoses, can also measure the severity of the given disorder.

Assessment of Disruptive Symptoms: DSM-IV Parent Version

Child Name:                                                  

Age:          

Grade:          

Sex (circle one): Boy    Girl

Today's Date:                        

Your Name:                                            

Relationship to child:                                

INSTRUCTIONS: Listed below are items that describe children's behaviour. Read each item carefully and check the box that best describes your child for the past six months. You may put DK next to any item that you do not know or do not wish to answer.

In the past six months, as compared to other children of the same age and sex, your child...Much less

than others

Less

than others

Same

as others

More

than others

Much more

than others

1. Interrupts others (e.g., butts into conversations or games)01234
2. Talks too much01234
3. Fidgets with hands or feet or squirms in seat01234
4. Blurts out answers before questions have been finished01234
5. Has difficulty playing quietly01234
6. Leaves seat when he/she is not supposed to01234
7. Has difficulty waiting his/her turn01234
8. Is 'on the go' or acts as if 'driven by a motor'01234
9. Runs about or climbs excessively in situations in which it is not appropriate01234
How much of a problem do any of the above behaviors (items 1 to 9) cause your child at...No ProblemsMild ProblemsModerate ProblemsSevere ProblemsVery Severe Problems
10. Home?01234
11. School?01234
12. Other (e.g., team sports, playgrounds, etc.)?01234
13. How old was this child when he/she started behaving this way?AGE IN YEARS                 
In the past six months, as compared to other children of the same age and sex, your child...Much less

than others

Less

than others

Same

as others

More

than others

Much more

than others

14. Is easily distracted01234
15. Does not seem to listen when spoken to directly01234
16. Fails to pay attention to details or makes careless mistakes in schoolwork or other activities01234
17. Does not follow through on instructions and fails to finish homework or chores (not because of stubborness or oppositional behaviour or failure to understand instructions)01234
In the past six months, as compared to other children of the same age and sex, your child...Much less

than others

Less

than others

Same

as others

More

than others

Much more

than others

18. Has difficulty holding his/her attention to tasks or play activities.
19. Loses things that are needed for tasks or activities (e.g., toys, school assignments, pencils, books, or tools)01234
20. Avoids, dislikes, or is reluctant to take part in tasks that require sustained mental effort (such as schoolwork or homework)01234
21. Has difficulty organizing tasks and activities01234
22. Is forgetful in daily activities01234
How much of a problem do the above behaviors (items 14 to 22) cause your child at…No

Problems

Mild

Problems

Moderate

Problems

Severe

Problems

Very severe

Problems

23. Home?01234
24. School?01234
25. Other (e.g., team sports, playgrounds, etc.)?01234
26. How old was this child when he/she started behaving this way?AGE IN YEARS                 
In the past six months, as compared to other children of the same age and sex, your child...Much less

than others

Less

than others

Same

as others

More

than others

Much more

than others

27. Argues with adults01234
28. Is spiteful or gets back at other01234
29. Blames others for his or her mistakes or misbehaviour01234
30. Actively defies or refuses to comply with or obey adults' requests or rules01234
31. Is angry and resentful01234
32. Is touchy or easily annoyed by others01234
33. Loses temper01234
34. Deliberately annoys people01234
How much of a problem do any of the above behaviors (items 27 to 34) cause your child at…No ProblemsMild ProblemsModerate ProblemsSevere ProblemsVery Severe Problems
35. Home?01234
36. School?01234
37. Other (e.g., team sports, playgrounds, etc.)?01234
38. How old was this child when he/she started behaving this way?AGE IN YEARS                 

Waschbusch, D. A., Sparkes, S. J., & Northern Region Partners In Action for Children and Youth. (2003). Rating scale assessment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) symptoms: Is there a normal distribution and does it matter? Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment, 21(3), 261-281.