Episode-Specific Conflict Tactics Scale (ESCT)

The Episode-Specific Conflict Tactics Scale (ESCT) is a tool used to measure the intensity, frequency, and duration of conflict tactics used by couples in a specific episode of conflict. This scale was developed in order to provide a more comprehensive assessment of the types of tactics used in a particular conflict episode than is possible with other measures. The ESCT is composed of three subscales: verbal aggression, physical aggression, and psychological aggression. Each subscale contains items that measure the intensity and frequency of the tactics used by both partners in the conflict episode. The ESCT also includes items that measure the duration of the conflict episode. The ESCT is designed to be used in both research and clinical settings. It is a useful tool for researchers studying conflict dynamics in couples, as well as for clinicians assessing the intensity of conflict in couples therapy. The ESCT can be used to assess the intensity of conflict in a particular episode, as well as to compare the intensity of conflict across episodes. The ESCT can also be used to identify patterns of conflict tactics used by couples over time. The ESCT is a reliable and valid measure of conflict tactics used in couples. It has been used in a variety of research studies and clinical settings and has been found to be a reliable and valid measure of conflict intensity.
For each statement:
A = Very true of me
B = Quite a bit true of me
C = Moderately true of me
D = A little bit true of me
E = Not at all true of me
1. I tried to change the subject.
2. I compromised with him/her.
3. I calmly discussed the issue.
4. I avoided him/her.
5. I showed concern about his/her feelings and thoughts.
6. I used threats.
7. I avoided the issue.
8. I explored solutions with him/her.
9. I criticized an aspect of his/her personality.
10. I sought a mutually beneficial solution.
11. I shouted at him/her.
12. I tried to postpone the issue as long as possible.
13. I reasoned with him/her in a give and take manner.
14. I tried to make him/her feel guilty.
15. I changed the topic of discussion.
16. I expressed my trust in him/her.
17. I was sympathetic to his/her position.
18. I blamed him/her for causing the conflict.
19. I teased him/her.
20. I was hostile.
21. I ignored the issue.
22. I showed that I lost my temper.
23. I talked about abstract things instead of the conflict issue.
24. I accepted my fair share of responsibility for the conflict.
25. I criticized his/her behavior.
26. I focused on the meaning of the words more than the conflict issue.
27. I tried to understand him/her.
28. I tried to intimidate him/her.
29. I ignored his/her thoughts and feelings.
30. I told him/her how to behave in the future.
31. I denied that there was any problem or conflict.
32. I was sarcastic in my use of humor.
33. I kept my partner guessing what was really on my mind.
34. I avoided the issue by focusing on how we were arguing instead of what we were arguing about.
35. I blamed the conflict on an aspect of his/her personality.
36. I explained why there was no problem at all.
 
Integrative tactics‚ distributive tactics‚ and avoidance tactics
 
This instrument can be found on pages 173-174 of The Relationship Between Conflict and Communication‚ Sex‚ Relationship Satisfaction‚ and other Relational Variables in Dating Relationships. Available online at:http://repositories.tdl.org/ttu-ir/bitstream/handle/2346/9978/Zacchilli_Tammy_Diss.pdf?sequence=1

Tammy Lowery Zacchilli‚ 2007. The Relationship Between Conflict and Communication‚ Sex‚ Relationship Satisfaction‚ and other Relational Variables in Dating Relationships. A Dissertation In EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY. Texas Tech University

Canary‚ D. J.‚ Cunningham‚ E. M.‚ & Cody‚ M. J. (1988). Goal types‚ gender‚ and locus of control in managing interpersonal conflict. Communication Research‚ 15‚ 426-446