Cross Racial Identity Scale (CRIS)

Cross Racial Identity Scale (CRIS)
Worrell‚ Vandiver‚ & Cross‚ 200‚ 2004
 
1.    As an African American‚ life in American is good for me.
2.    I think of myself primarily as an American‚ and seldom as a member of a racial group
3.    Too many Blacks “glamorize” the drug trade and fail to see opportunities that don’t involve crime.
4.    I go through periods when I am down on myself because I am Black.
5.    As a Multiculturalist‚ I am connected to many groups (Hispanics‚ Asian-Americans‚ Whites‚ Jews‚ gays & lesbians‚ etc.)
6.    I have a strong feeling of hatred and distain for all White people.
7.    I see and think about things from an Afrocentric perspective
8.    When I walk into a room‚ I always take note of the racial make-up of the people around me.
9.    I am not so much a member of a racial group‚ as I am an American.
10.I sometimes struggle with negative feelings about being Black.
11.My relationship with God pays an important role in my life.
12.Blacks place more emphasis on ha‎ving a good time than on hard work.
13.I believe that only those Black people who accept an Afrocentric perspective can truly solve the race problem in America.
14.I hate the White community and all that it represents.
15.When I have a chance to make a new friend‚ issues of race and ethnicity seldom play a role in who that person might be.
16.I believe it is important to have both a Black identity and a multicultural perspective‚ which is inclusive of everyone (e.g.‚ Asians‚ Latinos‚ gays & lesbians‚ Jews‚ Whites‚ etc.)
17.When I look in the mirror at my Black image‚ sometimes I do not feel good about what I see.
18.If I had to put a label on my identity‚ it would be “American‚” and not African American.
19.When I read the newspaper or a magazine‚ I always look for articles and stories that deal with race and ethnic issues.
20.Many African Americans are too lazy to see opportunities that are right in front of them.
21.As far as I am concerned‚ affirmative action will be needed for a long time.
22.Black people cannot truly be free until our daily lives are guided by Afrocentric values and principles.
23.White people should be destroyed.
24.I embrace my own Black identity‚ but I also respect and celebrate the cultural identities of other groups (e.g.‚ Native Americans‚ Whites‚ Latinos‚ Jews‚ Asian Americans‚ gays & lesbians‚ etc.)
25.Privately‚ I sometimes have negative feelings about being Black.
26.If I had to put myself into categories‚ first I would say that I am American‚ and second I am a member of a racial group.
27.My feelings and thoughts about God are very important to me.
28.African Americans are too quick to turn to crime to solve their problems.
29.When I have a chance to decorate a room‚ I tend to se‎lect pictures‚ posters‚ or works of are that express strong racial-cultural themes.
30.I hate White people.
31.I respect the ideas that other Black people hold‚ but I believe that the best way to solve our problems is to think Afrocentrically.
32.When I vote in an election‚ the first thing I think about is the candidate’s record on racial and cultural issues.
33.I believe it is important to have both a Black identity and a multicultural perspective‚ because this connects me to other groups (Hispanics‚ Asian-Americans‚ Whites‚ Jews‚ gays & lesbians‚ etc.)
34.I have developed an identity that stresses my experiences as an American more than my experiences as a member of a racial group.
35.During a typical week in my life‚ I think about racial and cultural issues many‚ many times.
36.Blacks place too much importance on racial protest and not enough on hard work and education.
37.Black people will never be free until we embrace an Afrocentric perspective.
38.My negative feelings toward White people are very intense.
39.I sometimes have negative feelings about being Black.
40.As a Multiculturalist‚ it is important for me to be connected with individuals from all cultural backgrounds (Latinos‚ gays & lesbians‚ Jews‚ Native Americans‚ Asian- Americans‚ etc.)
 
preencounter assimilation (.83 ≤α≤ .85)‚ preencounter miseducation (.77 ≤ α ≤ .89)‚ preencounter self-hatred (.70 ≤α≤ .88)‚ immersion-emersion antiWhite(.83 ≤α≤ .90)‚ internalization Afrocentric (.82 ≤α≤ .85)‚ and internalizationmulticulturalist inclusive (.76 ≤α≤ .86). (Vandiver et al 2002; Worrell et al‚ 2006)
for Assimilation (.70 to .85); Miseducation (.77 to .84); Self-Hatred (.70 to .89); Anti-White (.81 to .89); frocentricity (.80 to .85); and Multiculuralist (.74 to .85) (Hubbard‚ 2011)
 
0 = Strongly disagree‚ 1 = Disagree‚ 2 = Somewhat disagree‚ 3= Neither agree nor disagree 4= Somewhat agree‚ 5= Agree‚ 6= Strongly agree
 

Vandiver‚ B. J.‚ Cross‚ W. E.‚ Jr.‚ Fhagen-Smith‚ P. E.‚ Worrell‚ F. C.‚ Swim‚ J.‚ & Caldwell‚ L. (2000). The Cross Racial Identity Scale. State College‚ PA: Author.

Cross Jr‚ W. E.‚ & Vandiver‚ B. J. (2001). Nigrescence theory and measurement: introducing the cross racial identity scale (CRIS). In Ponterotto‚ J‚ G.‚ Casas‚ J‚ M.‚ Suzuki‚ L‚ A.‚ & Alexander‚ C‚ M. (Eds)‚ Handbook of Multicultural Counseling (2nd ed.). (pp. 371- 393). Thousand Oaks‚ CA: Sage Publications.

Vandiver‚ B. J.‚ Worrell‚ F‚ C.‚ Fhagen-Smith‚ P‚ E.‚ & Cross‚ W‚ E. (2002). Validating the cross racial identity scale. Journal of Counseling Psychology‚ 49(1)‚ 71-85.

Worrell‚ F. C.‚ Vandiver‚ B. J.‚ & Cross‚ W. E.‚ Jr.‚ (2004). The cross racial identity scale: technical manual – 2nd. edition. Berkeley‚ CA: Author.

Vandiver‚ B. J.‚ Worrell‚ F‚ C.‚ Fhagen-Smith‚ P‚ E.‚ & Cross‚ W‚ E. (2004). Reliability and Structural Validity of Cross Racial Identity Scale Scores in a Sample of African American Adults. Journal of Black Psychology‚ 30(4)‚ 489-505.

Worrell‚ F‚ C.‚ Vandiver‚ B. J.‚Fhagen-Smith‚ P‚ E.‚ & Cross‚ W‚ E. (2006).Generalizing Nigrescence Profiles: Cluster Analyses of Cross Racial Identity Scale (CRIS) Scores in Three Independent Samples. Counseling Psychologist‚ 34(4)‚ 519-547.

Worrell‚ F‚ C.‚ & Watson‚ S. (2008). A confirmatory factor analysis of cross racial identity scale (CRIS) Scores: testing the expanded nigrescence model. Educational and Psychological Measurement‚ 68‚ 1041-1058.