Almost Perfect Scale-Revised (APS-R)

Almost Perfect Scale-Revised (APS-R)
Slaney et al‚ 1996; Slaney et al‚ 200; Rice et al‚ 2014;
 
Almost Perfect Scale-Revised
Slaney‚ Mobley‚ Trippi‚ Ashby‚ & Johnson‚ 1996
1.    I have high standards for my performance at work or at school.
2.    I am an orderly person.
3.    I often feel frustrated because I can’t meet my goals.
4.    Neatness is important to me.
5.    If you don’t expect much out of yourself‚ you will never succeed.
6.    My best just never seems to be good enough for me.
7.    I think things should be put away in their place
8.    I have high expectations for myself.
9.    I rarely live up to my high standards.
10.I like to always be organized and disciplined.
11.Doing my best never seems to be enough.
12.I set very high standards for myself.
13.I am never satisfied with my accomplishments.
14.I expect the best from myself.
15.I often worry about not measuring up to my own expectations.
16.My performance rarely measures up to my standards.
17.I am not satisfied even when I know I have done my best.
18.I try to do my best at everything I do.
19.I am seldom able to meet my own high standards of performance.
20.I am hardly ever satisfied with my performance.
21.I hardly ever feel that what I’ve done is good enough.
22.I have a strong need to strive for excellence.
23.I often feel disappointment after completing a task because I know I could have done better.
Short Form of the Revised Almost Perfect Scale (SAPS)
Rice et al.‚ 2014; Slaney et al.‚ 2001
1.    I have high expectations for myself.
2.    Doing my best never seems to be enough.
3.    I set very high standards for myself.
4.    I expect the best from myself.
5.    My performance rarely measures up to my standards.
6.    I am hardly ever satisfied with my performance.
7.    I have a strong need to strive for excellence.
8.    I often feel disappointment after completing a task because I know I could have done better.
 
high standards (HS)‚ order (O)‚ and discrepancy (Disc)
 
 
1 “strongly disagree” to 6 “strongly agree”
high standards (1‚ 5‚ 8‚ 12‚ 14‚ 18‚ 22)‚ order (2‚ 4‚ 7‚ 10.)‚ and discrepancy (3‚ 6‚ 9‚ 11‚ 13‚ 15‚ 16‚ 17‚ 19‚ 20‚ 21‚ 23)
 

Slaney‚ R. B.‚ & Johnson‚ D. G. (1992). The Almost Perfect Scale. Unpublished manuscript‚ The Pennsylvania State University‚ University Park‚ PA.

Slaney‚ R. B.‚ Mobley‚ M.‚ Trippi‚ J.‚ Ashby‚ J.‚ & Johnson‚ D. G. (1996). The Almost Perfect Scale-Revised. Unpublished manuscript‚ The Pennsylvania State University‚ University Park‚ PA.

Slaney‚ R. B.‚ Rice‚ K. G‚ Mobley‚ M.‚ Trippi‚ J.‚ & Ashby‚ J. (2001). The Revised Almost Perfect Scale. Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development‚ 34‚ 130-145

Slaney‚ R. B.‚ Rice‚ K. G.‚ & Ashby‚ J. S. (2002). A programmatic approach to measuring perfectionism: The Almost Perfect Scales. In G. L. Flett‚ P. L. Hewitt (Eds.)‚ Perfectionism: Theory‚ research‚ and treatment (pp. 63-88). Washington‚ DC: American Psychological Association.

Mobley‚ M.‚ Slaney‚ R. B.‚ & Rice‚ K. G. (2005). Cultural validity of the Almost Perfect Scale-Revised for African American college students. Journal of Counseling Psychology‚ 52‚ 629-639.

Rice‚ K. G.‚ Rich‎ardson‚ C. E.‚ & Tueller‚ S. (2014). The Short Form of the Revised Almost Perfect Scale. Journal of Personality Assessment‚ 96(3)‚ 368-379.