Teachers Involving Parents (TIP)

Teacher Beliefs about Parental Involvement Scale
 
Directions to teachers: In this section‚ please indicate HOW MUCH YOU AGREE OR DISAGREE with each of the statements.
1=disagree very strongly‚ 2= disagree‚ 3=disagree just a little‚ 4= agree just a little‚ 5= agree‚ 6= agree very strongly
1. Parent involvement is important for a good school.             
2. Most parents know how to help their children with schoolwork at home.
3. Every family has some strength that can be tapped to increase student success in school.
4. All parents could learn ways to help their children with schoolwork at home‚ if shown how.
5. Parent involvement can help teachers be more effective with more students.
6. Parents of children at this school want to be involved more than they are.
7. Parent involvement is important for student success in school.
8. This school views parents as important partners.
 
Directions to teachers: In this section‚ please indicate HOW MUCH YOU AGREE OR DISAGREE with each of the statements.
1. I feel that I am making a significant educational         difference in the lives of my students.
2. If I try really hard‚ I can get through to even the most difficult and unmotivated students.
3. Children are so private and complex‚ I never know if I am getting through to them.
4. I usually know how to get through to students.
5. Most of a student’s school motivation depends on the home environment‚ so I have limited influence.
6. There is a limited amount that I can do to raise the basic performance level of students.
7. I am successful with the students in my class.
 8. I am uncertain how to teach some of my students.
9. I feel as though some of my students are not making any academic progress.                         
10. My students’ peers influence their motivation more than I do.
11. Most of a student’s performance depends on the home environment‚ so I have limited influence.
12. My students’ peers influence their academic performance more than I do.
Teacher Beliefs about Parents’ Efficacy for Helping Children Succeed in School
 
Directions to teachers: In this section‚ please indicate HOW MUCH YOU AGREE OR DISAGREE with each of the statements.
1. My students’ parents help their children learn.
2. My students’ parents have little influence on their children’s motivation to do well in school.
3. If my students’ parents try really hard‚ they can help their children learn even when the children are unmotivated.
4. My students’ parents feel successful about helping their children learn.
5. My students’ parents don’t know how to help their children make educational progress.
6. My students’ parents help their children with school work at home.
7. My students’ parents make a significant‚ positive educational difference in their children’s lives.
Teacher Beliefs about the Importance of Parent Involvement Practices
 
Directions to teachers: In this section‚ please indicate HOW IMPORTANT you believe each of the following is in your own teaching and parent-involvement practices. 
1= not at all important‚ 2= not important‚ 3= not very important‚ 4= somewhat important‚ 5= important‚ 6= very important                     
1. ha‎ving a conference with each of my students’ parents at least once a year.
2. Contacting parents about their children’s problems or failures.
3. Contacting parents when their children do something well or improve.
4. Involving parents as volunteers in my classroom.      
5. Telling parents about the skills their children must learn in each subject I teach.
6. Providing specific activities for parents to do with their children in order to improve their grades. (revised)
7. Giving parents ideas about discussing specific TV        shows with their children.
8. Assigning homework that requires parents to interact with their children.
9. Suggesting ways to practice spelling or other skills at home before a test.
10. Asking parents to listen to their children read.
11. Asking my students’ parents to help the child with homework.
12. Asking my students’ parents to ask the child about the school day.
13. Inviting my students’ parents to visit my classroom.
14. Asking my students’ parents to take the child to       the library or community events.
15. Giving parents ideas to help them become effective advocates for their children.
16. Sending home ‘letters’ telling parents what the children have been learning and doing in class.
Teacher reports of parent involvement.
Directions to teachers: In this section‚ please indicate HOW MANY OF YOUR STUDENTS’ PARENTS have participated in the following activities this year. Please record your best estimate for each item‚ and then respond to the ‘overall confidence rating’ at the end of this section.                                                               
1=none‚ 2=10-25%‚ 3=30-45%‚ 4=55-70%‚ 5=75-90%‚ 6=all
1. Attend scheduled parent-teacher conferences
2. Attend meetings or workshops at school.
3. Contact me when their children are ha‎ving a problem with learning.
4. Contact me when they have something really good to report about their child’s learning.
5. Volunteer in my classroom or in the school.
6. Ask me for specific activities they can do at home with the child.
7. Discuss TV programs with the child.
8. Help the child with homework.
9. Listen to the child read.
10. Give me information about the child’s needs‚ interests‚ or talents.
11. Talk to the child about the school day.
12. Visit my classroom at school.
13. Take the child to the library or community events.
14. Attend children’s performances at school.
In general‚ how much confidence do you have in the accuracy of your estimates on the items above? (Please circle the response that’s most appropriate for you)
I am completely confident / I am pretty confident/ I am just somewhat confident/  I am not very confident         
 
Directions to teachers: In this section‚ please indicate HOW OFTEN YOU have done each of the following this year. 
1=never‚ 2= once this year‚ 3= once each semester‚ 4= once a month‚ 5=once every 1-2 weeks‚ 6=1+ time(s) each week
 
1. Have a conference with a parent.        
2. Contact a parent if the child has problems or experiences failure.
3. Contact a parent if the child does something well or improves.
4. Involve a parent as a volunteer in my classroom.      
5. Tell a parent about the skills the child must learn        in each subject I teach.
6. Provide specific activities for a parent to do with the child in order to improve the child’s grades.
7. Give a parent ideas about discussing specific TV         shows with the children.
8. Assign homework that requires a parent to interact with the child.
9. Suggest ways to practice spelling or other skills at home before a test.
10. Ask a parent to listen to the child read.        
11. Ask a parent to help the child with homework.
12. Encourage a parent to ask the child about the school day.
13. Ask a parent to visit my classroom.
14. Ask a parent to take the child to the library or community events.
15. Give a parent ideas to help him or her become an effective advocate for the child.
16. Send home ‘letters’ telling parents what the children have been learning and doing in class.