Violent Intentions—Teen Conflict Survey

Violent IntentionsTeen Conflict Survey is a survey designed to assess the prevalence of violent behavior in teenagers. The survey was created by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The survey was designed to explore the prevalence of violent behavior in adolescents and to provide information about the factors that contribute to violent behavior. The survey consists of questions about the frequency of violent behavior, the types of violent behavior, and the factors that may contribute to violent behavior. The survey also includes questions about the individual's family and peer relationships, as well as questions about the individual's mental health. The survey is designed to be completed by adolescents between the ages of 12 and 18. The survey results provide a snapshot of the prevalence of violent behavior in teenagers. It is important to note that the survey is not intended to diagnose or treat any mental health condition. Instead, the survey is intended to provide information about the prevalence of violent behavior in adolescents and to identify factors that may be associated with violent behavior. The survey has been used in a number of research studies to examine the prevalence of violent behavior in teenagers. The survey results have been used to inform public health initiatives and to inform policy makers about the need for increased resources to address the issue of violence in adolescents. The survey is an important tool for understanding the prevalence of violent behavior in teenagers. It is important to note that the survey is not intended to diagnose or treat any mental health condition. The survey is intended to provide information about the prevalence of violent behavior in adolescents and to identify factors that may be associated with violent behavior.
The next time you find yourself really angry at someone or something‚ how likely is it that you would …
1. Ignore the situation?
2. Ignore the situation and get the person later?
3. Try to talk it out?
4. Suggest peer mediation?
5. Channel your anger into something constructive?
6. Laugh it off?
7. Try to reduce your anger?
8. Try to see the other person’s point of view?
 
These items measure intentions to use nonviolent strategies to control anger and conflict. Respondents are asked to indicate how likely they would be to adopt certain nonviolent behaviors the next time they get angry.
 
anger
 
This instrument can be found on page 122 of Measuring Violence-Related Attitudes‚ Behaviors‚ and Influences Among Youths: A Compendium of Assessment Tools‚ available online at: http://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/pdf/YV_Compendium.pdf
Middle school students‚ grades 6-8.
 
Point values are assigned as follows:
Very likely = 4
Likely = 3
Unlikely = 2
Very unlikely = 1
Item 2 is reverse scored. Responses are summed‚ with a possible range of 8 to 32. High scores indicate a stronger intention to use non-violent strategies.
 
 

Bosworth K‚ Espelage D. Teen Conflict Survey. Bloomington‚ IN: Center for Adolescent Studies‚ Indiana University‚ 1995. (Unpublished)