Adult Responses to Children’s Symptoms (ARCS)

Child Report Form
When you have a stomachache or abdominal pain‚ how often do your parents . . .
1.    Ask you what they can do to help?
2.    Express irritation of frustration with you?
3.    Do your chores or pick up your things instead of making you do it?
4.    Talk to you about something else to take your mind off it?
5.    Give you some medicine?
6.    Reassure you that you are going to be OK?
7.    Get you something to eat or drink?
8.    Bring you special treats or little gifts?
9.    Try not to pay attention to you?
10.Ask you questions about how you are feeling?
11.Let you stay home from school?
12.Encourage you to do something you enjoy (like watch TV or play a game)?
13.Tell you that you do not have to finish all of your homework?
14.Tell you there is nothing they can do about it?
15.Give you special privileges?
16.Stay home from work or come home early (or stay home instead of going out or running errands)?
17.Tell others in the family not to bother you or to be especially nice to you?
18.Tell you not to make such a fuss about it?
19.Pay more attention to you than usual?
20.Let you sleep in a special place (like in your parents’ room or on the couch)?
21.Tell you that you need to learn to be stronger?
22.Let you sleep later than usual in the morning?
23.Keep you inside the house?
24.Try to involve you in some activity?
25.Spend more time than usual with you?
26.Try to make you as comfortable as possible?
27.Tell you that they still expect you to do your chores or pick up your things around the house?
28.Check on you to see how you are doing?
29.Call the doctor or take you to the doctor?
 
Parent Form
When your child has a stomachache or abdominal pain‚ how often do you . . .
1.    Ask your child what you can do to help?
2.    Express irritation of frustration with your child?
3.    Do your child’s chores or pick up your child’s things instead of making him/her do it?
4.    Talk to your child about something else to take your child’s mind off it?
5.    Give your child some medicine?
6.    Reassure your child that he/she is going to be OK?
7.    Get your child something to eat or drink?
8.    Bring your child special treats or little gifts?
9.    Try not to pay attention to your child?
10.Ask your child questions about how he/she feels?
11.Let your child stay home from school?
12.Encourage your child to do something he or she enjoys (like watch TV or play a game)?
13.Tell your child that he/she doesn’t have to finish all of his/her homework?
14.Tell your child there’s nothing you can do about it?
15.Give your child special privileges?
16.Stay home from work or come home early (or stay home instead of going out or running errands)?
17.Tell others in the family not to bother your child or to be especially nice to your child?
18.Tell your child not to make such a fuss about it?
19.Pay more attention to your child than usual?
20.Let your child sleep in a special place (like in your room or on the couch)?
21.Tell your child that he/she needs to learn to be stronger?
22.Let your child sleep later than usual in the morning?
23.Keep your child inside the house?
24.Try to involve your child in some activity?
25.Spend more time than usual with your child?
26.Try to make your child as comfortable as possible?
27.Tell your child you still expect him/her to do his/her chores or pick up his/her thingsaround the house?
28.Check on your child to see how he/she is doing?
29.Call the doctor or take your child to the doctor?
 
Protect Scale‚ ARCS‚ Child Form
When you have a stomachache or abdominal pain‚ how often do your parents . . .
1.    Do your chores or pick up your things instead of making you do it?
2.    Give you some medicine?
3.    Get you something to eat or drink?
4.    Bring you special treats or little gifts?
5.    Let you stay home from school?
6.    Tell you that you do not have to finish all of your homework?
7.    Give you special privileges?
8.    Stay home from work or come home early  (or stay home instead of going out or runningerrands)?
9.    Tell others in the family not to bother you or to be especially nice to you?
10.Pay more attention to you than usual?
11.Let you sleep in a special place (like in your parents’ room or on the couch)?
12.Let you sleep later than usual in the morning?
13.Keep you inside the house?
14.Spend more time than usual with you?
15.Call the doctor or take you to the doctor?
 
Protect Scale‚ ARCS‚ Adult Form
1.    Do your child’s chores or pick up your child’s things instead of making him/her do it?
2.    Give your child some medicine?
3.    Get your child something to eat or drink?
4.    Bring your child special treats or little gifts?
5.    Let your child stay home from school?
6.    Tell your child that he/she doesn’t have to finish all of his/her homework?
7.    Give your child special privileges?
8.    Stay home from work or come home early (or stay home instead of going out or running errands)?
9.    Tell others in the family not to bother your child or to be especially nice to your child?
10.Pay more attention to your child than usual?
11.Let your child sleep in a special place (like in your room or on the couch)?
12.Let your child sleep later than usual in the morning?
13.Keep your child inside the house?
14.Spend more time than usual with your child?
15.Call the doctor or take your child to the doctor?
 
Protect‚ Minimize‚ Encourage/Monitor
 
 
0= never‚ 1= Once in a While‚ 2= Sometimes‚ 3= Often‚ 4 = always
Protect (3‚ 5‚ 7‚ 8‚ 11‚ 13‚ 15‚ 16‚ 17‚ 19‚ 20‚ 22‚ 23‚ 25‚ and 29)‚ Minimize (2‚ 9‚ 14‚ 18‚ 21‚ and 27)‚ Monitor (1‚ 4‚ 6‚ 10‚ 12‚ 24‚ 26‚ and 28)
 
 

Van Slyke‚ D.A.‚ & Walker‚ L.S. (2006). Mothers’ responses to children’s pain. ClinicalJournal of Pain‚ 22‚ 387-391.

Walker‚ L.S.‚ Levy‚ R.L.‚ & Whitehead‚ W.E. (2006). Validation of a measure of protective parent responses to children’s pain. Clinical Journal of Pain‚ 22‚ 712-716.

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