Parental Support for Fighting

Does your parent tell you these things about fighting?
Aggressive Solutions
1. If someone hits you‚ hit them back.
2. If someone calls you names‚ hit them.
3. If someone calls you names‚ call them names back.
4. If someone asks you to fight‚ hit them first.
5. If you can’t solve the problem by talking‚ it is best to solve it through fighting.
Non-Aggressive Solutions
6. If someone calls you names‚ ignore them.
7. If someone asks you to fight‚ you should try to talk your way out of a fight.
8. You should think the problem through‚ calm yourself‚ and then talk the problem out with your friend.
9. If another student asks you to fight‚ you should tell a teacher or someone older.
10. No matter what‚ fighting is not good; there are other ways to solve problems.
 
  • Hitting
  • Resolving conflicts
 
 
This instrument can be found on pages 306-307 of Measuring Violence-Related Attitudes‚ Behaviors‚ and Influences Among Youths: A Compendium of Assessment Tools‚ available online at: http://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/pdf/YV_Compendium.pdf
 
 
Point values are assigned as follows:
Yes=0‚ No= 1
Point values are assigned as indicated above. Point values are summed and then divided by the number of items in each subscale. Intended range is between 0 and 1.
Aggressive Solutions: High values indicate the perception of strong parental support for aggression or fighting in response to conflict.
Non-Aggressive Solutions: High scores indicate the perception of strong parental support for peaceful solutions to conflict.
 

Multisite Violence Prevention Project. Description of measures: cohort-wide student survey‚ 2004.Available from the Centers for Disease Control andPrevention‚ National Center for Injury Preventionand Control‚ Atlanta‚ GA

Orpinas P‚ Murray N‚ Kelder S. Parental influences on students’ aggressive behavior and weapon carrying.Health Education and Behavior1999;26(6):774-787.