Norms for Aggression and Alternatives

DESCRIPTION
Measures students’ perceptions of what other students in their school would think if students engaged in aggression or alternatives to aggression (school norms) and students’ own evaluations of the same behaviors (individual norms).
These items measure students’ perceptions of what other students in their schools would think if they engaged in certain behaviors (school norms)‚ and students’ own evaluations of the same behaviors (individual endorsement). Respondents are asked to indicate whether they (or other students) would like the behavior‚ would not like it‚ or would not care.
KEYWORDS
This tool touches on the following keywords:
·         Personal Attitudes and Beliefs
WHERE TO FIND OR DOWNLOAD
This instrument can be found on page 35-38 of Measuring Violence-Related Attitudes‚ Behaviors‚ and Influences Among Youths: A Compendium of Assessment Tools‚ available online at: http://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/pdf/YV_Compendium.pdf
FEES AND REQUIREMENTS
None noted.
AGE RANGE
Middle school students‚ grades6-8.
 
HOW TO ADMINISTER AND SCORE
Point values are assigned as follows:
Like it = 3
Not like it = 1
Not care = 2
Four subscales are included in this assessment. Point values for responses in each subscale are summed and then divided by the total number of items in the subscale:
School Norms for Aggression: Includes items 4‚ 8‚ 14‚ 18‚ 20‚ 22‚ 28‚ 30‚ 32 and 34.
School Norms for Alternatives to Aggression: Includes items 2‚ 6‚ 10‚ 12‚ 16‚ 24‚ 26 and 36.
Individual Norms for Aggression: Includes items 3‚ 7‚ 13‚ 17‚ 19‚ 21‚ 27‚ 29‚ 31 and 33.
Individual Norms for Alternatives to Aggression: Includes items 1‚ 5‚ 9‚ 11‚ 15‚ 23‚ 25 and 35.
SOURCE
Jackson J. (1966). A conceptual and measurement model for norms and roles. Pacific Sociological Review‚ 9:35-47.
Multisite Violence Prevention Project. Description of measures: cohort-wide student survey‚ 2004. Available from the Centers for Disease Control andPrevention‚ National Center for Injury Prevention and Control‚ Atlanta‚GA. (Unpublished)
Sasaki K. (1979). Present status of research on group norms in Japan. American Journal of Community Psychology‚ 7: 147-158.
Norms for Aggression and Alternatives
1. How would you feel if a kid in your school ignored a rumor that was being spread about him or her?
2. How would the kids in your school feel if a kid ignored a rumor that was being spread about him or her?
3. How would you feel if a kid in your school hit someone who said something mean?
4. How would the kids in your school feel if a kid hit someone who said something mean?
5. How would you feel if a kid in your school told another student who was starting to get into a fight that there’s a choice between fighting and other ways of solving problems?
6. How would the kids in your school feel if a kid told another student who was starting to get into a fight that there’s a choice between fighting and other ways of solving problems?
7. How would you feel if a kid in your school yelled at someone who said something mean?
8. How would the kids in your school feel if a kid yelled at someone who said something mean?
9. How would you feel if a kid in your school asked a teacher or another adult for help when challenged to a fight after school?
10. How would the kids in your school feel if a kid asked a teacher or another adult for help when challenged to a fight after school?
11. How would you feel if a kid in your school apologized to someone that he or she accidentally bumped into in the hall?
12. How would the kids in your school feel if a kid apologized to someone that he or she accidentally bumped into in the hall?
13. How would you feel if a kid in your school threatened someone who said something mean?
14. How would the kids in your school feel if a kid threatened someone who said something mean?
15. How would you feel if a kid in your school told another student to “stop and calm down” when the other student started to get into a fight?
16. How would the kids in your school feel if a kid told another student to “stop and calm down” when the other student started to get into a fight?
17. How would you feel if a kid in your school hit someone who hit first?
18. How would the kids in your school feel if a kid hit someone who hit first?
19. How would you feel if a kid in your school hit someone for no reason?
20. How would the kids in your school feel if a kid hit someone for no reason?
21. How would you feel if a kid in your school threatened someone because that person yelled first?
22. How would the kids in your school feel if a kid threatened someone because that person yelled first?
23. How would you feel if a kid in your school avoided a fight walking down a different hall to class?
24. How would the kids in your school feel if a kid avoided a fight by walking down a different hall to class?
25. How would you feel if a kid in your school listened to a friend’s side of the story‚ even though the two were in an argument?
26. How would the kids in your school feel if a kid listened to a friend’s side of the story‚ even though the two were in an argument?
27. How would you feel if a kid in your school yelled at someone for no reason?
28. How would the kids in your school feel if a kid yelled at someone for no reason?
29. How would you feel if a kid in your school yelled at someone who yelled first?
30. How would the kids in your school feel if a kid yelled at someone who yelled first?
31. How would you feel if a kid in your school threatened someone for no reason?
32. How would the kids in your school feel if a kid threatened someone for no reason?
33. How would you feel if a kid in your school threatened someone who hit first?
34. How would the kids in your school feel if a kid threatened someone who hit first?
35. How would you feel if a kid in your school took a deep breath when he or she started to lose his temper?
36. How would the kids in your school feel if a kid took a deep breath when he or she started to lose his temper?